AA 8  George French Angas  Guide to Records
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Series AA8/06
New Zealand Watercolours - 'New Zealanders Illustrated'
Date Range1844
Quantity60 cm, 49 Watercolours
ProvenanceGeorge French Angas
Description

In 1844, George French Angas sets foot in New Zealand 75 years after Captain Cook and only 4 years after the signing of the Treaty of Waitangi. He embarks aboard a schooner in the month of July and spends 6 months visiting Wellington, Porirua, Marlborough Sounds, Auckland, Waikato district, Mokau coast, Upper Wanganui and Taupo. Angas tracked through the countryside either by foot or canoe, recording scientifically by sketching, painting and describing the landscape, the Maori people, their architecture, canoes, weapons, utensils, flora, fauna, food, craft, customs and culture, conscious that the advent of whalers, traders and missionaries arriving since the 1790s impacted upon traditional culture. Retrospectively, Angas writes in the preface of 'The New Zealanders Illustrated' dated 1 July 1846:

'Perhaps at the present moment, no country in the world is more peculiarly interesting than New Zealand; no race of men more singular that its Aboriginal Inhabitants.The position the New Zealanders hold with respect to thousands of our countrymen, and the great change that is daily going on in their physical and social condition, renders it necessary that a more correct idea of them should be obtained at home, than one offered by mere description. Up to the present time, the New Zealander, it is submitted, has never been carefully and faithfully pourtrayed; and his habits, costumes, and works of art, though so rapidly disappearing before the progress of Christianity and Civilisation, are yet unrecorded by the pencil of the artist.

To accomplish this task, I visited both Islands of New Zealand, and spent a considerable period in travelling round their coasts, and penetrating though the interior-by seeking out nearly every tribe of natives, and living amongst them for some time, in the remote and almost unknown parts of the country, I have succeeded in obtaining portraits of the most important Chiefs, with their families, and have made drawings, on the spot, of all objects of interest connected with their history.

I take this opportunity of returning my thanks to Thomas Spencer Forsaith, Esq., the Protector of Aborigines, at Auckland, for his useful assistance on many points connected with the natives, and in procuring me the friendship of several influential Chiefs.

I also return my thanks to the Missionaries, and those Gentlemen at the various settlements from whom I received such polite assistance and attention.'

Whilst Angas's paints a romantic picture in his description, in reality he endured some hardships along the way: hunger, eating rancid food, wading in deep water and mud, sand flies, mosquitoes and ill-health. Curiosity, saw him take risks such as sketching sites considered wahi tapu (sacred). Wahi tapu can be permanent, temporary, tangible or intangible and can be applied to sites, events and people. It provides the spiritual and cultural base of the Maori people and can vary from iwi to iwi (tribe) that had he been caught, he would have incurred the wrath of the local chief. Watercolours that have been identified as wahi tapu, that is restricted from public view due to cultural sensitivities, are labelled as restricted. The process of identifying restricted watercolours is a work in progress managed by Eleazar Bramley of the Taupo Museum in conjunction with the relevant Iwi elders. To date determinations have only been made by the Ngati Tuwharetoa Iwi. Consultation for permission to display images of the watercolours is also in progress.

Not only did Angas use his brush and pencil but collected specimens as well that were described in journal articles and later donated to public institutions.

What follows is an attempt to extract parts of Angas's voyages as described in his 1847 publication 'Savage Life and Scenes in Australia and New Zealand' and correlate them to the watercolours held in the South Australian Museum. The watercolours form the basis for the lithographs published in 'The New Zealanders Illustrated' (Series 6) and 'Portraits of the New Zealand Maori' (Series 7). Not all the watercolours were published and some of the watercolours are not held by the South Australian Museum. The Inventory Title is the original watercolour title. The inventory listing below, not only relates the watercolours to the lithographs but also notes any variations from the original to the publication. The lithographers included Hawkins, Benjamin Waterhouse (1807-1889), Hawkins, Frances Louisa (nee Keenan, 1839-1868), Giles, James William (1801-1870) and Angas himself.

In 1844, just 7 months after landing in South Australia Angas records:

'One evening in the month of July, whilst sitting in my verandah at Adelaide, I took it into my head to visit New Zealand: a friend had shown me some beautifully ornamented weapons he had brought from thence, and that night I went to bed and dreamed of native pahs [fortified villages] and stately tattooed chiefs. In the morning I was packing up my trunk to go on board a schooner belonging to the South Australian company, which was to sail with a supply of flour for the European settlements in New Zealand.' (p224, Volume 1)

Eight days after leaving port, Wilson's Promontory is sited and in less than 8 days later, the summit of Mount Egmont can be seen in the distance. The very next day, anchor is cast in Port Nicholson (currently, Wellington). Upon disembarkation Angas checks into the Barratt's Hotel. The hotel collapsed in the 1855 earthquake after sustaining damage from the 1848 earthquake. For more on the Barratt's hotel see Bremner, Julie 'Barratt's Hotel: The Victorian Rendezvous' in Hamer, D & Nicholls, R (ed) The Making of Wellington 1800-1914, 1990, Victoria University Press.

'This is the only good hostel in the place, and is the rendezvous for all the gentlemen of Wellington; in fact, it is the exchange, coffee-room, auction-mart, public-house, and general place of meeting and resort for all the merchants, idlers, and speculators with which this settlement abounds: billiards are played without interruption, and liquors and champagne circulate rather too freely for a new colony. The state of society may be inferred, from the not unusual circumstance of the most fashionable of these gentlemen being trundled home in wheelbarrows from a ball, at the late hour of ten in the morning, on two succeeding days.' (p 234, Volume 1)

Angas makes the observation that staples such as milk, butter and meat are expensive, the poorer classes subsisting on pork and potatoes which are purchased from the Maori people. Maori men on the other hand buy muskets, powder and blankets, the women buy dresses, earrings and finery.

On the morning of his landing Angas visits Pipitea pah where he meets Nga Tata, the chief of Pipitea and Kumototo, and the father of E Tako the present chief of Port Nicholson. For several days he visits the local pahs and sketches the local people. Angas, quickly learnt to pay compliments to the highest ranking chief and sketch his portrait first before a slave, child or person of less importance. Without the cooperation of the highest ranking chief then the other members of then iwi (tribe) would not be willing either.

At Port Nicholson Angas sketches:

  • Te Rau (Koterau), daughter of Tariu the chief of Tokaanu in Taupo and E Pupa, sister of E Tako (AA 8/7/6)
  • Ko te Hameme, Ko Patara and Tatu, August 1844 (AA 8/7/8)
  • Abraham Taupo (AA 8/7/9)
  • Hori, Ko Te Waihaki, Te Kauwai and Pihaiti (AA 8/7/7)
  • children at Pitoni (AA 8/6/21)

At Te Aro pah, Angas sketches:

  • Artongna and Tahuna from Queen Charlotte's Sound (AA 8/7/11)
  • E Manu and Taituha from Queen Charlottes Sound (AA 8/7/12)
  • Aitu (AA 8/7/13)

During Angas's last afternoon at Te Aro, Kutia (AA 8/7/3), the wife of Rauparaha and son Ko Katu (Tamihana, Thompson, AA 8/7/2) arrive at Port Nicholson. Kahoki (AA 8/6/5), the daughter of the chief of Roturua Lakes and niece of Rauparaha were also there and she encouraged her relatives to sit for Angas. Angas then sketches Rauparaha (AA 8/7/2) and Hamaiti, Chief of Okahuhu (AA 8/7/3).

Along the shores of the harbour are several villages, the principal of which is Kai Warra-Warra, governed by Chief Te Ringa Kuri. Here Angas sketches Taringa-Kuri's house (AA 8/7/1). Angas pays his next visit to Nga Hauranga, previously governed by the late chief Warepouri, which is 3 miles from Wellington and then onto Petoni which is at the head of the harbour near the entrance to the valley of the Hutt and where E Puni resides. After completing a sketching tour of the local Maori people, Angas sets on foot for the Porirua Harbour. He takes with him Tuarau (Kopai, nephew of Te Rauparaha) son of Na Horua (Tom Street) who they visit on the way. Na Horua is the tohunga (priest) and therefore his body is considered tapu (sacred). At the time of their visit, his recently ill wife, E Wai (AA 8/6/5), was made tapu for 3 days. This meant that everything she touched also became tapu. Breaking tapu was punishable.

Angas proceeds to the mouth of the harbour and arrives at Porirua pah. Nearby is one of Jordy Thoms' residences, a master whaler for more than 20 years. Angas also recounts the Wairau Massacre, which was the first serious clash between the Maori people and the British settlers after the signing of the Treaty of Waitangi on 17 June 1843.

At Porirua, Angas sketches Pu and her three children, Roro, Toa and infant (AA 8/6/9).

Angas arrives at Rangihaeata's pah which is a few hundred yards beyond taupo pah and gives the Chief gifts of tobacco to distract him whilst sketching his portrait. There, Angas finds Rangihaeata's second wife, E Pori (AA 8/6/10) and Hurihanga a tohunga (priest)(AA 8/7/4). Angas crosses by canoe over to the Island of Mana or Table Island with three of Rangihaeata's slaves. After he arrives, Angas notes that the architecture has changed; the previous ornamented wooden huts were replaced by raupo huts. There he sees two elaborately ornamented buildings: Rangihaeata's house called Kai Tangata or Eat man (AA 8/6/3) and the mausoleum of E Tohi (AA 8/6/41), Rauparaha's sister. Angas records:

'Day after day have I spent exploring ruined and tapued pahs, frequently by stealth, searching for these primitive works of an extraordinary and ingenious people. A desire to preserve memorials of the skill and ingenuity of [the Maori people], who themselves ere long may pass away, and become, like their houses, matters of history, induced me to make carefully coloured drawings on the spot of the most curious and characteristic specimens of Maori architecture and carving.' (p266-267, Volume 1)

Angas sketches the interior of a house and two women weaving at Rangihaeata pah (AA 8/6/48 number IV).

At some stage, Angas sketches E Paki and Rangitaurau (AA 8/7/5) at Porirua on 1 September 1844.

No sooner had Angas returned from Porirua that he boards a schooner, and sails to Cloudy Bay, in the South Island. Upon arrival, Angas makes his way to visit Old Thoms, the whaler, situated at Te awa iti, approximately 1 mile up the Tory Channel. He was the first European to discover and enter Port Nicholson. With George Thoms (AA 8/6/8) as his guide they trudged through the hills to find the ruins of Nga ti kahunis pah. There, they encounter a woman, who posed for the portrait with her pig by her side but ‘was wondering, no doubt, what strange art was being practised upon her'. They then visit Okukuri pah sitated just inside the Tory Channel before returning to Te awa ti. There he sketches E Karo and E Kau (AA 8/7/10).

Angas was keen to visit the tomb of Huriwenua (AA 8/6/14), located approximately 6 miles up the Tory Channel, so with Thoms and his children they set sail in Black Charley an Australian Aboriginal person's schooner. Huriwenua's village was wahi tapu as he had only recently died.

Angas leaves Thoms after their return to Cloudy bay and sets sail round the east coast of New Zealand to Auckland, a government town, located in Waitemata harbour. After 8 days, he disembarks and makes his way by foot to Orakai, 6 miles away. On the way to Orokai, the party pass through a potato ground with a cooking shed in one corner of the plantation (AA 8/7/16). There he meets Moana, son of Te Kawaw a principal chief of the Ngati watua, and his cousin Rawhide.

In Orakai, Angas meets with his friend Forsaith, a Protector of Aborigines, who helps influence Te Kawaw and other prominent people to sit for him, including Moana who is the son of Te Kawaw (AA 8/7/14), his nephew Paora, his wife Nga mako, and Rawiti who is the grandson of Kawau (AA 8/7/14). Angas notes that the women in the vicinity of Auckland wear European dress but with a woven mat worn over the top. Angas also sketches Ngeungeu (AA 8/6/2) who is the daughter of Tara (Irirangi) (AA 8/6/24) and the wife of Thomas Maxwell with her son James (AA 8/6/2) and Stephen (AA 8/6/4).

Back in Auckland, Angas stays with his friend Dr Andrew Sinclair, the Colonial Secretary and paints Pomare (AA 8/7/15), the Chief from the Bay of Islands, Nene (Thomas Walker) the Chief of Hokianga and Patuone (see AA 8/6/1), Nene's older brother. At this point Angas, records observations on everyday life such as the introduction of corn by Cook and Maori people no longer weave with flax but buy blankets.

Angas decides to explore the interior of the North Island which is only accessible by foot as the forests are dense, and there are swamps, rivers and precipes to overcome. With Forsaith who was on his way to the British settlement of Taranaki as his companion, they set out on their 800 mile journey in the early spring of 1844, heading up the Waikato River along the Western coast. Angas records:

'But when penetrating the interior and visiting districts of Mokau and Taupo Lakes, I was accompanied only by natives; and during the whole period of my sojourn with the New Zealanders, I invariably experienced both hospitality and protection. My mission amongst them was one of peace: I did not covet their land; and my coming from Europe for the purpose of representing their chiefs and their country was considered by them a compliment. The chiefs readily acceded to my requests, and facilitated the purpose of my journey; and I was everwhere known by the title of Te pakeha no te Kene Ingerangi, or 'The stranger from the Queen of England:' loudly and proudly do my native guides herald my approach to a kainga [settlement] maori with this appellation.' (p2, Volume 2)

Angas continues:

'Clad in our bush costume, but without weapons, and each with a took or long walking-staff in our hands, my fellow-traveller and myself set off in excellent spirits, accompanied by five Maori lads, who carried our baggage; this consisted of bundles of clothing, sketching apparatus, collecting boxes, a small tent, and a basket of provisions: which they severally carried in their pikau or knapsacks, strapped over their shoulders with the leaves of flax. As we passed along, our lads exchanged farewell salutations with their native friends; the latter shouting out, with a long condoling whine, Haere ra! haera ra! which means, Go my friends! Go! This was returned by E noho!' Remain, my friends! Remain!' (p3, Volume 2)

One of the guides and fellow travellers with Forsaith during the Wellington to Auckland overland journey was Akanui, the nephew of Reretawhangawhanga (AA 8/7/19). The watercolour also includes Te Aorere (AA 8/7/19).

After passing through a region of extinct volcanoes, wading through swamps and marshes, skirting the shores of Manukao and wading across the mud flats of the Tamaki River with small crabs biting at their legs, they finally arrive at nightfall, and Angas is offered a flea infested mattress whilst Forsaith sleeps on fern in a barn that belonged to an old Captain who commanded ships in the opium trade. Angas comments that they battle sand flies by day and mosquitoes by night.

On 27 September the travellers arrive at Papakoura, stay for the night and continue on in their journey. They reach a very deep river:

'The lads divested themselves and then waded through the river with their luggage on their heads, water up to their necks. They then returned and carried us across, with our feet resting on one fellows shoulders and our backs on the head of another.' (p11, Volume 2)

The next stop is the settlement of Tuimata where Angas sketches Chief Haimona (Simon) and his wife. Angas claims they both liked his sketch calling it wakapaipai, or ‘beautiful'. Angas also sketches Ramari, Haimona's daughter, and child (AA 8/7/20). Leaving on the following day, they walked several miles and encounter Chief Hiputea/Huiputea (AA 8/7/21) and his son little Hori. (AA 8/7/22) Continuing on their journey they cross the Waikato River and land at Koruakopupu. Angas writes:

'A far different era has dawned upon the descendants of those fierce warriors. The New Zealanders are no longer a fighting people; they find raising supplies for Europeans a far more pleasant and profitable occupation. The good effects arising from the influence of missionaries is apparent, even if civilization had been their only aim. The New Zealanders are an intelligent and interesting race; they have fine minds and good dispositions; and if properly treated; no people could behave better. Much has been foolishly alleged against them, by individuals who are entirely ignorant if the true character and meritorious conduct of many Maories.' (p20, Volume 2)

Here Angas sketches Chief Te Taepa of Te Kaitutae (AA 8/7/23) who was visiting Wirihona (Wilson) at Waipa (AA 8/7/21) and Te Maru (AA 8/6/32), son of a Chief at Koruakopopo. He writes:

'the hospitality of the Maories to strangers is proverbial; travellers are always welcome amongst them. Tobacco is the only money needed for a European in passing through the country; a present of a small quantity of this weed, on leaving, being considered as an ample remuneration for food and shelter; for a fig of tobacco they will furnish a dozen eggs, or a basket of potatoes or kumeras. It is only on the coast, in the vicinity of the European settlements, that the natives require utu, or payment in coin.' (p22, Volume 2)

The party leaves by canoe and land at Kapau before continuing on to a small kainga where they meet the wife of Wirihona who tangi (lamentation) with the wife of an inferior chief (AA 8/6/48 number V). They then go to Kaiote, the pah of the celebrated Te Whero Whero (AA 8/6/35) who is the principal chief of all the Waikato tribes.

'As usual, I explored the remotest concerns of the pah, in search of anything new for my pencil, and seeing a square deal box elevated on posts and covered with a roof raised by means of slender sticks, I was curious to know what it contained; it was evidently tapu and on lifting up the lid I found that is was filled with old garments, which I afterwards learned were the property of a very celebrated person lately deceased, and that these garments had been placed within this wahi tapu under the most rigorous tapu by the tohunga: who would probably have pulled my ears had he discovered me peeping at these scared relics.' (p35, Volume 2)

After a 2 mile walk, they stop at the Residence of Mr Ashwell, a missionary of the Church Missionary Station of Pepepe (butterfly). Ashwell organises sittings for Angas: Te Paki, a chief and his wife (AA 8/7/24); and Te Amotutu (AA 8/6/33), a young chief of Waikato who is related to Te Paki. Angas also paints Ashwell's dying son and one of their domestic servants who they call the Vixen (AA 8/7/25).

On 3 October, they leave in canoes and enter the Waipa which joins the Waikato 3 or 4 miles from Pepepe. After passing Whakapaku and Noterau and landing briefly at Ko Ngahokowitu they head for Hopetui. Here they see Chief Wideona and his family. They also meet a sister of Karaka (Clark, AA 8/6/39) who is the chief of Waikato Heads that Angas sketched in Auckland. Angas shows her the portrait and she tangis with it to her tears come. That evening Wirihona comes into Angas's tent and talks about cannibalism and the supply of shrunken heads to the Europeans. Slaves are killed to keep up with the demand.

At Hopetui, on the banks of the Waipa, Angas sketches two children (AA 8/6/12).

The party journey to Whata Whata where they visit Te Whero Whero (Potatau) and Angas paints his portrait. Te Whero Whero gives Angas a letter of introduction to Te Heuheu Mananui (Tukino) the celebrated chief of Taupo Lake dated 4 Ocotber 1844. The translation is as follows:

'Friend Heuheu, -Health to you! Let your hospitality by very great to this foreigner who is going to see you. Your name has carried him away. He is a writer of images; he belongs to me-to Potatau. Be kind to this European. Take heed you do not despise my book. He is a strange foreigner from England. By me, Your friend, Potatau.' (p52, Volume 2)

The party leave on foot along the Waipa for Waingaroa where they encounter the Wesleyan Missionary's wife, Mrs Wallis, at the mission station. On 7 October, Angas sketched portraits of principal chiefs, including Wiremu Nera (Awaitaia, William Naylor, AA 8/6/4) and Paratene Maioha (Broughton) that had come to meet Forsaith but also wanted their portraits to go to England. They Chiefs were keen to have Europeans amongst them so they offered to sell land to establish a township. Also on the 7th Angas sketches Muriwhenua (John King), his sister Mekameka and wife Haea (AA 8/7/26). At Waingaroa, Angas sketches Wiremu Nera's daughter Toea and her attendant. (AA 8/6/44)

On the way to Aotea, the party call on Chief Te Moanaroa (Tepene, Stephen, AA 8/6/4) who is related to the government interpreter. They continue on their journey stopping briefly at Te Mata where Angas sees an old woman weaving a basket from the leaves of the Freycinetia Banksii (AA 8/6/48 number II) before reaching their destination, the residence of Reverend Mr Smales. There Angas sketches Paora Muriwenua (AA 8/6/42/1). The next stop is the mission station at Ahuahu and residence of Mr Whiteley. Angas notes:

'I was portraying the most important chiefs of the neighbourhood, together with their families; and through the kindness of that gentleman I was enabled to procure likenesses of many who, under ordinary circumstances, would have been difficult to approach. An old chief and tohunga approaches (father of Te Pakaru) who had a large bump on his head. His name was Te Upehi [Te Uepehi, AA 8/7/28].' (p69-70, Volume 2)

At Ahuahu, Angas sketches Nga Niho, wife of Rangituataea (Portrait of Rangituataea is AA 8/7/30) and Nga Whea a chief of Ngati Maniapoto (AA 8/6/27). On 11 October a meeting is held between chiefs including Te Pakaru (Apokia, AA 8/6/36) and Te Waro (Te Waru, AA 8/6/36) and Forsaith. At some stage he paints Te Pakaru's children (AA 8/6/23). Also at Ahuahu, Angas sketches Taituku and Rahi (AA8/7/29).

Angas then heads up the Waiharikiki River and paints Ohu (AA 8/6/30/1), tohunga of the Waiharikiki River and Chief Rangituatea who was wounded in the battle of Taranaki. He also sketches burial site of Chief Pehi at Te Pahe (AA 8/7/27).

On 14 October Angas parts company with Forsaith. He writes:

'From Ahuahu my companion and myself prepare to start on separate routes mine striking at once into the very heart of the interior, through the wild region of Mokau and Wanganui to the Taupo Lakes. Forsaith who had proved a most agreeable and intelligent companion during the journey to Ahuahu, left in Apokea's canoe, accompanied by his four lads, whilst another canoe conveyed my party in an opposite direction across the harbour. My travelling companions now consisted of my two natives, E Pera, who was a Nga Puifrom the Bay of Islands, and E Rihia, a mission lad of Waipa, belonging to the Ngati Apakura tribe; we were also joined by a couple of natives proceeding homewards to Wakatumutumu.' (p74, Volume 2)

The party cross the Marakopo river, visit Piri-piri which is occupied by locals who have become Jesuits, shown the foot prints of the Whatumaui, crosses the river Wahuatakawau and arrives at Warikaokao. On 16 October, the party head for Mania where Angas sketches Chief Ngohi (AA 8/7/31) and his principal wife who was under tapu. A boy that had been travelling with Angas was a son of Ngohi and remained there. Angas then leaves with Ngohi's eldest son and journey to Whakatumutumu, arriving at 4 pm. There they encounter the missionary and his wife named Miller. Angas sketches Chief Te Ngaporutu (AA 8/6/26) who had converted to Christianity and his wife Rihe (AA 8/6/26).

The party then proceed to Pari-pari, where Angas sketches a whare (AA 8/7/36), by first crossing the Waipa and seeing Mokau falls. Upon arrival at 4pm that day, they meet Lewis who is married to the daughter of Taonui, the principal chief of the district and successor to Tariki. They also meet Chief Taonui (AA 8/7/32) who wears a flute around his neck made from one of the leg bones of his enemy Pomare. He has in his possession the original suit of armour that was given to the Bay of Island Chief, Shongi (E hongi) by King George IV when he was in England. The suit of armour passed onto Tetori, then Te Whero Whero and then Taonui himself. Angas also sketched Tariki's widow (AA 8/6/41) and child.

On 21 October, Angas continues with only his two 'lads' for Taupo. On the same day they reach Pouketouto where they stayed with an inferior chief, family and slaves. He sketches one of the aged slave women (AA 8/6/45 number XIV). On the next day they sail down the Wanganui River and travel through the volcanic region.

On 23 October the party leave at sunrise and reach Tuhua where the people are Christianised and receiving instruction from Mr Maunsell who is a local teacher rather than a missionary. At Tuhua, Angas sketches Te Te Mara (Son of Brown) and another child (AA 8/7/33). The next day the party leave Tuhua and arrive at Tereinga where Angas finds the Taupo Chief Te Rangiarawaha (Rawide, AA 8/734). After sketching the Chief, the party crosses River Teringamutu and arrive at a village. Angas delivers a letter from Taonui, the Chief of Mokau, asking if one of his relatives could guide the party across country to Taupo Lake.

With the new guide the party see Mount Tongariro, Ruapahu and Tauhara, Lake Taupo, Tihiwihiwi before reaching the Taupo settlement of Te Rapa. There they encounter Hiwikau, brother of Te Heuheu (Mananui, Tukino) the warrior chief and his son Tamiti. A letter of introduction is delivered to Te Heuheu from Te Whero Whero. Angas also encounters Newman, a sailor who served onboard one of his father's vessels employed in the West India trade.

'During my stay at Taupo, I frequently experienced considerable trouble when sketching, from the prevalence of the tapu; so many objects being regarded as sacred: anything relating to food, if presented with the same pencil that depicted the head of the sacred chief, or put in the same portfolio with it, is considered as sad and fearful sacrilege. The whole of my sketches narrowly escaped being committed to the flames, through the indignation of Ko Tariu (AA 8/6/34) watercolour includes his wife E Pori); and they were only rescued by the influence of my friend, the chief of Te Heuheu. I was obliged in future to make drawings if the patukas, tapu buildings, &c., by stealth. Even the Tongariro itself was forbidden to represent under the pain of utu, or payment; but I afterwards accomplished it with the assistance of one of my guides, who was a Christianised native. But he received every hospitality and protection.' (p112, Volume 2)

Whilst in Te Rapa, Angas visits the natural hot spring baths, the Ko Waihi falls (AA 8/6/11) and witnesses a Maori swing (AA 8/6/43). Angas paints Te HeuHeu (AA 8/6/46)and his brother Hiwikau (AA 8/6/46).

'The idea that his portrait was going to England flattered him and made him proud. Now that I have secured the portrait of this great man, I have access to all the chiefs of Taupo, and candidates for sitters are increasingly numerous and importunate. Being under the protection of Te Heuheu, he has tapued the hut in which I am staying, together with all m y things; so that no one can meddle with them, and they are as safe as if they were in the Bank. Te Heuheu is generous and hospitable and does not demand payment in return.' (p115, Volume 2)

At the boiling springs of Lake Taupo, Angas sketches Papuka (nephew of Te Heuheu), Ko Tiki (son of a Tokaanu chief) and Tao (AA 8/6/13).

Angas leaves Te Rapa accompanied only by Rihia, a Wesleyan, as E Pera had lamed himself. Te heuheu gives Angas permission to visit Motupoi pah but was told not to sketch Mount Tongariro as it was tapu. Angas disobeys the order and sketches the mountain without Rihia knowing. By this time Anags was running low on supplies:

'My only remaining supplies are about a tablespoon of salt, which I highly prize, and a couple of ounces of tea! No flour, sugar, bread, butter, or any comforts of civilised life. Yet I am quite contented and happy; though by no means insensible to such privations: on returning to civilisation I shall probably appreciate and enjoy those luxuries more than many who never experienced the want of them.' (p123, Volume 2)

On 30 October, Angas sketches Mungakahu (AA 8/6/18) and his wife (AA 8/6/18) at Roto-aire, at the base of Mount Tongariro. Angas sketches the mountain once again without Rihia knowing before returning to Te Papa. Upon his arrival, Angas and Newman head to Waitahanui, the old pah of Te Heuheu which is now in ruins, by canoe. Angas hides his tapu sketches from Te Heuhue who would have destroyed them. At Waitahanui, Angas sketches Heuheu's cookhouses (AA 8/7/16) and a whare (AA 8/7/39).

Angas and party then leave for Omurua where E Pera tells Angas that his hands are tapu after sketching the head of Te Heuheu so Angas threatens to burn all his sketches and E Pera threatens to inform the chief by letter. Although in this instance, Angas is frustrated by the custom of tapu, on other occasions he turns it to his own advantage. When the people taunt Angas to show him his sketches, he tells them that they are all tapu.

Angas's next stop is Tutukamauna where there are Christians belonging to the Waipa Mission. At this time Angas was ‘seized with a violent influenza' and hungry as the supplies had long been exhausted.

On 4 November Chief Pilate and his wife accompanies Angas for a few miles on their way to a potato ground. Along the way, Angas sees the Ruatahina mountains and swims across the River Mungakino.

On 6 November, the party arrive at the church missionary station at Otawhao and are greeted by Rev. J Morgan and his wife. The missionary not only tends to the local's spirituality but tends to the sick as well. Mrs Morgan is called mother as her advice, aid and care is sought after.

Angas ventures to the ruins of Raroera, four miles from Otawhao, where examples of the elaborately ornamented architecture still remains. One of the finest is the mausoleum erected by Te Whero Whero in honour of his favourite daughter (AA 8/6/6), Pari Hori and her son Tawera (AA 8/7/35). The mausoleum was carved by Parinui, who is also a priest, with the head of a bayonet. Nearby is a carved tiki painted in kokowai (red ochre, AA 8/6/49).

Back at the mission station, Angas encounters Blind Solomon (Horomona Marahau, AA 8/6/19) who recounts his early life and exploits as a warrior including the battle where he fought against E Hongi who had brought back firearms and gunpowder from England. Horomona managed to escape after he was captured; 600 people were slaughtered. Soon after he met Rev. H Williams at Matamata and converted to Christianity. Also at Matamata, Angas sketches Wiremu Tamihana Tarapipipi (William Thompson, AA 8/7/38).

A short distance from the mission house is the old ruined pah of Otawhao. There Angas encounters Maketu House (AA 8/6/16) that was built by Chief Puata in commemoration of the taking of maketu and the old war bell (pahu, AA 8/6/16, AA 8/6/47 number XIII). At Ngahuruhuru, a settlement about 4 miles from Otawhao Angas sketches Chief Kahawai (AA 8/6/42/2) and Hongi Hongi (AA 8/6/7) the celebrated Taranaki warrior.

On 11 November, Angas leaves for the Waipa River with Mr Morgan's horse and 'lad' Ringi-ringi. At 4 miles they meet Mr Ashwell from Pepepe who was coming to Otawhao to procure medicine for a dying child. They traverse the plains of Matuketuke before reaching Whatawhata at 2pm on 12 November. There they see Te Whero whero and sketches Mokerau. Angas writes:

'being pressed for time, I was unable to paint the two other chiefs named in Mr Morgan's note (AA 8/7/41); and one of them a fine fellow, and a near relation of Te Whero Whero-stood upon the high bank of the river, as our canoe pushed off, shaking his tomahawk at me, and upbraiding me for not taking his portrait as well as that of Mokerau. Mokerau is the principal chief of Otawhao. And a convert to Chrisitianity. Last winter he went, accompanied only by Awaitaia or William Naylor (AA 8/6/4) of Waingaroa, into the midst of his enemies at Roturua; with whom he had waged a deadly war for nine years, which had not been concluded. The object of this bold and singular mission was to produce a good feeling and conclude the war; and it had the desired effect.' (p156, Volume 2)

The party leave Whatawahta, spend the night at Pepepe and proceed down river to Tuakau the next morning. There they are joined by a Christian Chief Moses, his wife, son and two females, one of which was a slave girl and they all proceed down the river together. Along the way they see Te paki and his wife. The party reach Tuakau on 13 November and the proceed on foot to Waitemata. On 14 November they leave Moses and his canoe at Tuakau and reach Tuimata, the kainga of Chief Haimona and spend the night.

On 15 November the party for Auckland, stopping to see Captain Smale at Papakoura on the way. They reach Auckland after travelling 35 miles on foot. The next day, E Pera left to go on to the Bay of Islands and Rihia returned to Waipa. Angas writes:

'The payment which I made each of them consisted of a couple of large blankets, a regatta shirt, and a pair of trousers, with which they were highly delighted and perfectly satisfied.' (p161, Book 2)

In late November, a few days after Angas’s arrival at Auckland, he sets sail for Sydney, New South Wales, on board the brigantine, Coolongatta bringing with him a maori youth of about 13 years of age called James Pomara, son of chief who was orphaned after a raid. The next morning they disembark at Kauwau, where they were detained for several days to load copper ore, owned by the Scottish Loan Company.

On 7 December, Angas and Pomare embark once again and set sail for the Bay of Islands. Three days later they cast anchor at Kororarika Beach. Angas notes at Pahia, opposite the bay, are the headquarters of the Church Mission in New Zealand, the dwelling of Mr Busby the late Government resident situated near the Waitangi (Weeping of the Waters) River. At Kororarika is the head quarters of the Jesuit Mission and the Catholic chapel of the Bishop Pompalier.

On 12 December, Angas and Pomare set sail for New South Wales, casting anchor in Sydney Cove on 30 December. On New Years Day they embarked aboard the brig Emma for Adelaide, South Australia. On 10 September 1845, Angas and Pomare ser sail on the Royal Tar for England. After a short stop on Rio De Janeiro on the way, they land in Dover on 22 February 1846 and arrives in Gravesend on the 23rd.

The watercolours were first exhibited from 18 to 20 June 1845 in the new legislative chamber on North Tce, by the permission and patronage of Governor Grey from 10am-4pm, admission 1 shilling. Catalogues were available for 6d each. A month later the works were exhibited in the Royal hotel in Sydney. In England, Angas exhibits his work on the 17 March 1846 at the 5th soiree of the British and Foreign Institution. Two days later the exhibition of 300 works open in the Egyptian hall in Piccadilly for three months.
The watercolours were reproduced as an imperial folio series of coloured plates titled 'The New Zealanders Illustrated', issued in 10 parts from 1846 to 1847 at one guinea each. 'Portraits of the New Zealand Maori' was first published in 1972 by A.H. and A.W. Reed Ltd.

ArrangedNumerical. Imposed by Archives. Arranged by Kaye Mead

Inventory Listing

AA 8/6/1

'Honi Heki. Patuone.'

 

Original Watercolour
There is one original watercolour within this frame.

Notes: Portrayed are the notable Rangatira (chief) Hone Heke and Eruera Patuone. Heke on the left wears white trousers, a sailor's hat and jacket and holds a rifle in his right hand with the butt resting on the ground. In his right ear is a shark's tooth ear pendant and he is wrapped in a kahu kuri (dog skin cloak). Patuone on the right wears a long white robe with a short red cape worn diagonally across the torso. Both men have moko (traditional Maori facial tattoo).

Signed by Angas

Lithograph
The original has been used in Angas's The New Zealanders.

Lithograph caption: 'Heki Patuone; Honi Heki and Patuone.'
Plate title: 'Heki and Patuone.'
Plate: I
Notes:
Lithographer: W Hawkins

Iwi [Tribe]: Nga-Puhi
Location: Hokianga

Former Accession Number 1528(2)

  Creator George French Angas
Control AA 8/6/1
Date Range 2 October 1844
Quantity 1 Watercolour 32x23cm; Mount 44.5x34.5cm
Inventory Identifier AA 8/6/1
Series AA8/06

AA 8/6/2

'James Maxwell. Son of Ngeungeu. Ngeungeu. Daughter of Tara. or Irirangi. Chief of Ngatitai. Sept. 1844.'

 

Original Watercolour
There is one original watercolour within this frame.

Notes: Ngeungeu is the daughter of Tara, principal chief of Ngai Tai of the Auckland district. Ngeungeu was married to the Waiheke Island trader Thomas Maxwell who was lost at sea. On her head rests a garland of Kowhai Ngutu Kaka, a red flower named after a native parrot. She is drapped in a ngore-paheke (cloak) made with scarlet woollen pompoms and a stitched woollen border. Ngeungeu has a kauwae (traditional Maori woman's chin tattoo). Her son James wears a pake (rain cape), a much heavier garment.

Signed by Angas

Lithograph
The original has been used in Angas's The New Zealanders.

Lithograph caption: 'Ngeungeu and her son James Maxwell.'
Plate title: 'Ngeungeu, and her son James Maxwell.'
Plate: III
Notes: Lithograph reversed.
Lithographer: W Hawkins

Iwi [Ttribe]: Ngati Tai/Ngai Tai
Location: Omupuia

Former Accession Number 1528(4)

  Creator George French Angas
Control AA 8/6/2
Date Range September 1844
Quantity 1 Watercolour 33.5x24cm; Mount 44.5x34.5cm
Inventory Identifier AA 8/6/2
Series AA8/06

AA 8/6/3

'Rangihiaeta's house of Mana Id Called "Kai Tangata". (eat man)'

 

Original Watercolour
There is one original watercolour within this frame.

Notes: This intricately ornamented meeting house was carved by the rangatira (chief) Rangihaeata. All carved and wooden areas of the house have been stained in kokowai (red ochre). The carved figures in the amo (upright support post) on either side of the house feature paua (sea snail) shell inlaid eyes. The amo provide support for the maihi (sloping barge boards). At the centre of this apex are the carved forms known as the tekoteko and koruru (carved head). In the porch area the doorway and window frames have also been carved in detail. The symbolic Maori patterns known as kowhaiwhai have been painted in black and red on the porch rafters. In the foreground sit two figures with a gourd used for storing and transporting water. In the background are the tops of palisade posts and stakes. Endorsed by Rangihaeata's signature.

Lithograph
The original has been used in Angas's The New Zealanders.

Lithograph caption: 'Rangihaeatas celebrated house on the Island of Mana, called 'Kai Tangata" (eat man)'
Plate title: 'Rangihaeata's house on the Island of Mana, called 'Kai Tangata" (eat man).'
Plate: IV
Notes: No titles on lithograph
Lithographer: JW Giles

Iwi [Tribe]: Ngati Toa
Location: Mana Island which is just off the west coast of the Wellington and Porirua area, Cook Strait

Former Accession Number 1620

  Creator George French Angas
Control AA 8/6/3
Date Range 1844
Quantity 1 Watercolour 25x34cm; Mount 31.5x44.5cm
Inventory Identifier AA 8/6/3
Series AA8/06

AA 8/6/4

'Oct 7th 1844. Te Moanaroa. Stephen. A Chief of Wangaroa. Te Awaitaia or William Naylor. Principal Chief of the Nga Timahanga. Tribe.'

 

Original Watercolour
There is one original watercolour within this frame.

Notes: The seated figure is Te Awaitaia principal chief of Whaingaroa who is wrapped in a thick mat cloak comprising yellow and black tags. The standing figure is Te Manaroa (Stephen) also known as Te Amoahanga and Amoanaroa. He is a chief of Whaingaroa and wears a korowai-ngore (cloak) made with twisted black thrumbs and large red and blue woollen pompoms. Both rangatira (chief) have moko (traditional Maori facial tattoo). Tall fencing stakes are in the background.

Signed by Angas

Lithograph
The original has been used in Angas's The New Zealanders.

Lithograph caption: 'Te Moanaroa (Stephen) Waingaroa. Te Awaitaia (William Naylor)'
Plate title: 'Te Awaitaia and Te Moanaroa: Waingaroa.'
Plate: V
Notes: No titles on lithograph
Lithographer:

Iwi [Tribe]: Ngati Mahanga, Tainui
Location: Whaingaroa which is the Maori place name of the Raglan Harbour on the west coast of the North Island.

Former Accession Number 1617

  Creator George French Angas
Control AA 8/6/4
Date Range 7 October 1844
Quantity 1 Watercolour 33.5x24cm; Mount 53x40.5cm
Inventory Identifier AA 8/6/4
Series AA8/06

AA 8/6/5

'E Wai. Wife of Tuarau the son of Na Horua or Tom Street. Kahoki. Niece of Rauparaha. and daughter of Te Wehiarangi. Chief of Roturua Lakes.'

 

Original Watercolour
There is one original watercolour within this frame.

Notes: Both women were of notable descent, nieces of the Rangatira (chief) Te Rauparaha. Wai is seated wearing a red handkerchief over her head as a sign of mourning and wrapped in a European blanket worn as a cloak. She was married to Tuarau who was Angas's guide on his 1844 expedition in New Zealand. The standing figure is Kahoki who is wrapped in ngore-paheke (cloak) that has had red, blue and green woollen stiching. Behind them is the Taupo pa (fortified village), the roof of a whare (house) and a beached waka (canoe). Endorsed with E Wai's signature.

Signed by Angas

Lithograph
The original has been used in Angas's The New Zealanders.

Lithograph caption: 'E Wai and Kahoki, nieces of Rauparaha'
Plate title: 'E Wai and Kahoki, nieces of Rauparaha.'
Plate: IX
Notes: On lithograph: 'E Wai Kahoki'
Lithographer: W Hawkins

Iwi [Tribe]: Ngati Toa
Location: Rotorua Lakes and Taupo

Former Accession Number 1528(3)

  Creator George French Angas
Control AA 8/6/5
Date Range 1844
Quantity 1 Watercolour 33x24.5cm; Mount 44.5x34.5cm
Inventory Identifier AA 8/6/5
Series AA8/06

AA 8/6/6

'A Papatupapaku. Monument to Te Whero Whero's favourite daughter. At Ngahuruhuru. Waipa.'

 

This item is restricted.

Original Watercolour
There is one original watercolour within this frame.

Notes: This papatupapaku (monument) was raised by Potatau Te Wherowhero, paramount chief of the Waikato tribes in memory of his favourite daughter. This site is wahi tapu (sacred burial site) which is restricted. The site is surrounded by picket like fencing. The elaborately carved structure at the deserted pa (fortified village) of Raroera was estimated to be 12 to 14 feet high.

Signed by Angas on Mount

Lithograph
The original has been used in Angas's The New Zealanders.

Lithograph caption: 'Monument to Tewhero's daughter, at Raroera Pah, near Otawhao.'
Plate title: 'Monument to Te Whero Whero's daughter, at Raroera Pah.'
Plate: X
Notes:
Lithographer: JW Giles

Iwi [Tribe]: Tainui
Location: Otawhao

Former Accession Number 1577

  Creator George French Angas
Control AA 8/6/6
Date Range 1844
Quantity 1 Watercolour 33x24cm; Mount 44.5x34cm
Inventory Identifier AA 8/6/6
Series AA8/06

AA 8/6/7

'Hongi Hongi or Nga Toki. Nga Ti Hinetu Tribe. Ngahuruhuru. Rangiowea.'

 

Original Watercolour
There is one original watercolour within this frame.

Notes: Hongi Hongi also known as Toki stands in bare feet wrapped in two cloaks: a korowai-ngore (cloak) made with black twisted thrumbs and black and red woollen pompoms is worn over the top of a kakahu (cloak) with a yellow base and fringing which has red and bue woollen pompoms. Hongi Hongi has a moko (traditional Maori facial tattoo) and wears a greenstone (nephrite jade) ear pendant. In his right hand he holds a mere pounamu (greenstone hand club). Behind him are palisade posts from a fortified fence.

On the reverse side of the watercolour is a sketch of a Maori tattoo and notes.

Signed by Angas

Lithograph
The original has been used in Angas's The New Zealanders.

Lithograph caption: 'Hongi Hongi'
Plate title: 'Hongi Hongi'
Plate: XI
Notes:
Lithographer: W Hawkins

Iwi [tribe]: Ngati Hinetu, Tainui
Location: Rangiaowhia, Otawhao, Waikato

Former Accession Number 1496

  Creator George French Angas
Control AA 8/6/7
Date Range 1844
Quantity 1 Watercolour 33.5x24cm; Mount 44.5x34.5cm
Inventory Identifier AA 8/6/7
Series AA8/06

AA 8/6/8

'George Thoms. A half-cast boy, nephew of Rauparaha. Queen Charlotte's Sound. Sep. 23. 1844.'

 

Original Watercolour
There is one original watercolour within this frame.

Notes: George Toms is the eldest son of Joseph Toms a master whaler and nephew of the Rangatira (chief) Te Rauparaha. This young boy stands leaning against a fence holding a stick in his right hand, wearing European clothing. A waka (canoe) in full sail in the harbour is in the backgound.

Signed by Angas

Lithograph
The original has been used in Angas's The New Zealanders.

Lithograph caption: 'Roperta of Kawhia George Thoms a half cast boy nephew of Rauparaha'
Plate title: Roperta and George Thoms.
Plate: XII
Notes: The lithograph comprises two watercolours. AA 8/6/8 is on the right. The watercolour on the left, 'Roperta of Kawhia' is not held by the South Australian Museum Archives.
Lithographer: JW Giles

The lithograph comprises two watercolours. AA 8/6/8 is on the right. The watercolour on the left, 'Roperta of Kawhia' is not held by the South Australian Museum Archives.

Iwi [Tribe]: Ngati Toa
Location: Queen Charlotte Sound

Former Accession Number 1530(5)

  Creator George French Angas
Control AA 8/6/8
Date Range 23 September 1844 -
Quantity 1 Watercolour 33x24cm; Mount 44.5x34.5cm
Inventory Identifier AA 8/6/8
Series AA8/06

AA 8/6/9

'E Roro. E Toa. E Pu. Nga Ti Toa tribe. Porirua Pa. Cooks Sts Sept 1844.'

 

Original Watercolour
There is one original watercolour within this frame.

Notes: Pu stands with her two sons Roro and Toa and her infant. Pu and the infant are wrapped in a korowai-ngore (cloak) made with black twisted thrumbs, red woollen pompoms and stitching along the border. Both boys are wearing a pake (rain cape). Roro is seated and has a pied fantail bird, attached to his right ear.

Signed by Angas

Lithograph
The original has been used in Angas's The New Zealanders.

Lithograph caption: ' A woman and her sons of Nga Ti Toa Tribe. Porirua Cooks Straits'
Plate title: 'E Pu and her children.'
Plate: XIV
Notes: On lithograph: 'E Raro E Toa E Pu'
lithographer: W Hawkins

Iwi [Tribe]: Ngati Toa
Location: Porirua pa, Cook's Straight

Former Accession Number 1494

  Creator George French Angas
Control AA 8/6/9
Date Range 23 September 1844
Quantity 1 Watercolour 33.5x24cm; Mount 44.5x34.5cm
Inventory Identifier AA 8/6/9
Series AA8/06

AA 8/6/10

'E Pori. A Waikato woman. Wife of one of Rauparaha's chiefs. E Rangi Wawa. Daughter of E Pori. Porirua Pa. Cook's Sts.'

 

Original Watercolour
There is one original watercolour within this frame.

Notes: Pori stands wearing a corse pake (rain cape) made from unprepared flax. She wears a large tuft of white gull feathers in her left ear. Her bottom lip is tattooed and the markings on her cheeks are a sign of mourning. Rangi is seated and wears a greenstone (nephrite jade) ear pendant. She is wrapped in a korowai-ngore (cloak) made with thrumbs that have been scraped and dyed and black twisted thrumbs. A whale vertebra is used in the fortified fence. A pataka (enclosed and elevated store house) can be seen in the background. In the foreground is a gourd used for transporting and storing water.

Signed by Angas

Lithograph
The original has been used in Angas's The New Zealanders.

Lithograph caption: 'E Pori. E Rangi Wawa. Porirua Pah.'
Plate title: 'E Pori and her daughter E Rangi Wawa.'
Plate: XX
Notes:
lithographer: W Hawkins

Iwi [Tribe]: Ngati Toa
Location: Porirua

Former Accession Number 1607

  Creator George French Angas
Control AA 8/6/10
Date Range 1844
Quantity 1 Watercolour 34x24cm; Mount 53x40.5cm
Inventory Identifier AA 8/6/10
Series AA8/06

AA 8/6/11

'Falls of Ko Waihi. Taupo.'

  IMAGE »
 

Original Watercolour
There is one original watercolour within this frame.

Notes: This papa kainga (home) belonged to Iwakau, brother to the paramount chief of Ngati Tuwharetoa, Te Heuheu Tukino (Mananui II). The front gable of the whare (house) is coloured with kokowai (red ochre) and has a tekoteko which is the carved figure wearing a European hat attached to the apex of the maihi (sloping barge boards). The ware is surrounded by native foliage and steep rocky cliffs which give way to the falls referred to by Angas as 'Ko Waihi'. Iwakau and and his wife are sitting in the front verandah.

Signed by Angas on mount

Lithograph
The original has been used in Angas's The New Zealanders.

Lithograph caption: 'House of Hiwikau, mother of Te Heuneu. And falls Ko Waihi, at Te Rapa, Taupo Lake'
Plate title: 'The house of Hiwikau, and the falls Kowaihi, at Te Rapa, Taupo Lake.'
Plate: XXI
Notes:
Lithographer: JW Giles

Iwi [Tribe]: Ngati Tuwharetoa
Location: Te Rapa, Taupo Lake

Former Accession Number 1624

  Creator George French Angas
Control AA 8/6/11
Date Range 1844
Quantity 1 Watercolour Mount 53x40.5cm
Formats Mounted Works of Art
Inventory Identifier AA 8/6/11
Series AA8/06

AA 8/6/12

'On River Waipa. At Hopetui. Komata. Ngahuia. Girls of Waipa. Tongaraukaka. A boy of Nga Ti Mahuta Tribe'

 

Original Watercolour
There is one original watercolour within this frame.

Notes: Two children sit whilst one child stands in front of a waka tiwai (river canoe) resting on the river bank. Fern tree bracken is spread in the hull for comfort. On the ground between the children is a hoe (paddle). The child standing and the child seated on the waka tiwai both wear korowai-ngore (cloak) made with red, green and blue woollen pompoms, twisted black thrumbs and fringing. The child seated on the waka tiwai wears a necklace of blue beads and is wrapped in a korowai-ngore with black twisted thrumbs and fringing.

Signed by Angas

Lithograph
The original has been used in Angas's The New Zealanders.

Lithograph caption: 'Children on the banks of the Waipa.'
Plate title: 'Children on the banks of the Waipa.' (AA 8/6/12) 'Children at the boiling springs near Taupo Lake.' (AA 8/6/13)
Notes: The lithograph comprises two watercolours, AA 8/6/12 and 13
Plate: XXII
Lithographer: Louisa Hawkins

Iwi [Tribe]: Ngati Mahuta, Tainui
Location: Hopetui, River Waipa

Former Accession Number 1522

  Creator George French Angas
Control AA 8/6/12
Date Range 1844
Quantity 1 Watercolour 27.5x21.5cm; Mount 35.5x29.5
Inventory Identifier AA 8/6/12
Series AA8/06

AA 8/6/13

'Papuka, a lame boy nephew of Te Heuheu. Taupo Lake. Ko Tiki. A boy ofTukanu. Tao. A girl at Tukanu. Near the boiling ponds.'

  IMAGE »
 

Original Watercolour
There is one original watercolour within this frame.

Notes:
The child standing in the centre with three sticks in his hand is Ko Tiki the son of a Tokaanu chief. Boiling springs of Lake Taupo can be seen in the background. Tiki is wearing a korowai-ngore (cloak) with twisted thrumb fringing along its border and thrumbs that have been scraped and dyed.The child seated is Papuka, a disabled boy and nephew to the paramount chief of Ngati Tuwharetoa, Te Heuheu Tukino (Mananui II). Tao, the girl on the right, wears a string of large blue beads diagonally across her chest, an ear adornment and a folded cloak wrapped around her waist. In the foreground is a gourd used for transporting and storage of water which has Maori tattoo designs.

Signed by Angas

Lithograph
The original has been used in Angas's The New Zealanders.

Lithograph caption: 'Children at the boiling springs near Taupo Lake'
Plate title: 'Children on the banks of the Waipa.' (AA 8/6/12) 'Children at the boiling springs near Taupo Lake.' (AA 8/6/13)
Notes: The lithograph comprises two watercolours, AA 8/6/12 and 13
Lithographer: Louisa Hawkins

Iwi [Tribe]: Ngati Tuwharetoa
Location: Tokaanu, Taupo

Former Accession Number 1614

  Creator George French Angas
Control AA 8/6/13
Date Range October 1844
Quantity 1 Watercolours 27.5x21.5cm; Mount 35.5x27cm; 27.5x21.5cm; Mount 36x26.5cm; Overall Mount 50.5x68.5cm
Inventory Identifier AA 8/6/13
Series AA8/06

AA 8/6/14

'Recent tomb of Huriwenua. A chief of Nga Ti Toa Tribe. In Queen Charlotte's Sd'

 

This item is restricted.

Original Watercolour
There is one original watercolour within this frame.

Notes: This site is wahi tapu (sacred burial site) which is restricted. The tomb has been enclosed within two fenced boundries painted in kokowai (red ochre) with white feathers fastened at intervals.The chief's name has been carved near the top of the centrally placed waka whakamaumaharatanga (canoe cenotaph). Clusters of kaka (parrot) feathers have been attached to the cenotaph and painted with the symbolic scrolled patterns known as kowhaiwhai. On either side of the tomb is a raupo reed whare (house).

Signed by Angas on mount

Lithograph
The original has been used in Angas's The New Zealanders.

Lithograph caption: 'Tomb of Huriwenua, a late chief of the Nga Ti Toa Tribe Queen Charlotte Sound'
Plate title: 'Tomb of the late Chief Huriwenua, Queen Charlotte's Sound.'
Plate: XXIII
Notes:
Lithographer: JW Giles

Iwi [Tribe]: Ngati Rahiri, Ngati Toa, Te Atiawa
Location: Huriwhenua, Queen Charlotte's Sound

Former Accession Number 1529(1)

  Creator George French Angas
Control AA 8/6/14
Date Range 1844
Quantity 1 Watercolour 24.5x31.5cm; Mount 34.5x44cm
Inventory Identifier AA 8/6/14
Series AA8/06

AA 8/6/15

'Rangitakina. Chief of Ngaitorungiohiri. Bay of Plenty.'

 

Original Watercolour
There is one original watercolour within this frame.

Notes: Rangitakina stands bare feet and wrapped in two cloaks: a ngore-paheke (cloak) made with red woollen pompoms and fringing is worn over the top of a kahu kuri (dog skin cloak) made of white dogs' hide and hair and has deep black borders. He has a moko (traditional Maori facial tattoo). In the background are fish drying on stakes, a cliff, three people on the shore and two beached waka tete (fishing canoe).

Signed by Angas

Lithograph
The original has been used in Angas's The New Zealanders.

Lithograph caption: 'Rangitankina. A chief of the Bay of Plenty, on the east coast.'
Plate title: 'Rangitankina, A chief of the Bay of Plenty.'
Plate: XXIV
Notes: Facial features and background different in lithgraph.
Lithographer: W Hawkins

Iwi [Tribe]: Ngati Awa
Location: Bay of Plenty

Former Accession Number 1623

  Creator George French Angas
Control AA 8/6/15
Date Range 1844
Quantity 1 Watercolour 34.5x24cm; Mount 53.5x40.5
Inventory Identifier AA 8/6/15
Series AA8/06

AA 8/6/16

''Maketu.' House. Ancient War Temple. Otawhao Pa.'

 

This item is restricted.

Original Watercolour
There is one original watercolour within this frame.

Notes: Maketu house is situated at Otawhao in the Waikato district and was built to commemorate a battle. This house is wahi tapu (sacred burial site) which is restricted. Many of the carved forms represent chiefs and warriors that fought in the battle: Hikarea, chief of Tauranga; Taipari, chief of Tauranga; Tarea, chief; Puke; Wakatau; and Pokana, chief of Mata Mata. The inside porch rafters have been painted with the symbolic scrolled patterns referred to as kowhaiwhai. 'Ancient War Temple at Maketu (inside mount) Maketu House, Otawhao Pah (outside mount)'.

On the reverse side of the watercolour is a sketch of the pahu warbell. See AA 8/6/47 for the watercolour.

Signed by Angas on mount

Lithograph
The original has been used in Angas's The New Zealanders.

Lithograph caption: 'Maketu House at Otawhao Pah. Built by Puatia, to commemorate the battle of Maketu'. Some of the words were not printed.
Plate title: 'Maketu house at Otawhao.'
Plate: XXV
Notes:
Lithographer: JW Giles

Iwi [Tribe]: Tainui
Location: Otawhao, Waikato

Former Accession Number 1619

  Creator George French Angas
Control AA 8/6/16
Date Range 1844
Quantity 1 Watercolour 24x34cm; Inside Mount 33x44.5cm; Mount 40.5x53.5cm
Inventory Identifier AA 8/6/16
Series AA8/06

AA 8/6/17

'E Tohi. A young woman of Barris Id.'

 

Original Watercolour
There is one original watercolour within this frame.

Notes: Tohi stands wearing two cloaks both made with cylindrical flax thrumbs that have been scraped and dyed black. Scarlet red woollen pompoms line the top border of one and at the bottom border of the second with the addition of twisted thrumbs. In the background is a whare (house) coloured with kokowai (red ochre) which has a tekoteko or carved figure wearing a European hat attached to the apex of the whare (house).

Signed by Angas

Lithograph
The original has been used in Angas's The New Zealanders.

Lithograph caption: 'E Tohi, a young woman of Barrier Island'
Plate title: 'E Tohi, a young woman of Barrier Island.'
Plate: XXVI
Notes:
Lithographer: W Hawkins

Iwi [Tribe]:
Location: Barrier Island

Former Accession Number 1528(1)

  Creator George French Angas
Control AA 8/6/17
Date Range 1844
Quantity 1 Watercolour 33x24cm; Mount 44x34.5cm
Inventory Identifier AA 8/6/17
Series AA8/06

AA 8/6/18

'Tongariro volcano. Ko Mari. his wife. Mungakahi. Chief of Tongariro. near Taupo Lake. The chief of Tongariro, and his wife Ko Mari.'

  IMAGE »
 

Original Watercolour
There is one original watercolour within this frame.

Notes: The Rotoaira chief Mungakahi stands wearing a flax kakahu (cloak) made with yellow and black hieke (tags) over large blankets. Mungakahi has a moko (traditional Maori facial tattoo), a greenstone (nephrite jade) ear pendant and holds a taiaha (long club fighting staff) which has been decorated with kaka (parrot) feathers and dog hide. His wife Mari is seated wearing a greenstone hei tiki pendant and a kakahu (cloak) made with thrumbs that have been scraped and dyed. Mount Tongariro is in the background.

Signed by Angas

Lithograph
The original has been used in Angas's The New Zealanders.

Lithograph caption: 'Mungakahu, chief of Motupoi. and his wife Ko Mari.'
Plate title: 'Mungakahu, chief of Motupoi, and his wife.'
Plate: XXVI
Notes: Subtle change of facial features and hair in lithograph.
Lithographer: JW Giles

Iwi [Tribe]: Ngati Tuwharetoa
Location: Motupoi, a pa [fortified village] in lake Rotoaira, south of Lake Taupo

Former Accession Number 1529(3)

  Creator George French Angas
Control AA 8/6/18
Date Range October 1844
Quantity 1 Watercolour 34x24.5cm; Mount 44x34cm
Inventory Identifier AA 8/6/18
Series AA8/06

AA 8/6/19

'Blind Solomon. Horomona Maruhau. Tribe Ngatikoura. Otawhao Waikato.'

 

Original Watercolour
There is one original watercolour within this frame.

Notes: Horomoana Maruhau also known as 'Blind Solomon' stands bare feet with a staff in his hand. Once a warrior, he converted to christianity and became a teacher through the Church Missionary Society at Otawhao. He has a moko (traditional Maori facial tattoo) and wears a full length korowai-ngore (cloak) that has predominantly black twisted thrumb and fringing made from muka (fibre extracted from flax).There is a very small amount of red and green woollen fringing along the top.

Signed by Angas

Lithograph
The original has been used in Angas's The New Zealanders.

Lithograph caption: 'Horomona Marahau. or Blind Solomon'
Plate title: 'Horomona Marahau, or Blind Solomon.'
Plate: XXIX
Notes:
Lithographer: W Hawkins

Iwi [Tribe]: Ngati-Koura, Tainui
Location: Otawhao, Waikato

Former Accession Number 1509

  Creator George French Angas
Control AA 8/6/19
Date Range 1844
Quantity 1 Watercolour 33x24cm; Mount 44.5x34.5cm
Inventory Identifier AA 8/6/19
Series AA8/06

AA 8/6/20

'The New Zealanders. IX. Patukas.'

  IMAGE »
 

Original Watercolour
There are six original watercolours within this frame. Captions are as follows:

  1. 'Pataka or store for maize. Waiharikeke River.'
  2. 'Pataka. at Te Rapa. Taupo.<'/li>
  3. no data
  4. 'Rangihiaeta's Pataka.'
  5. 'Woman beating flax.'
  6. 'Kaka (parrot) on nestor.

  • 'Te Heuheu's Pataka'
  • 'Taupo. October 1844'

Notes: the watercolour is divided into three layers. Top left (I) is a simple pataka (enclosed and elevated store house) utilised to store and preserve seeds, maize and roots. There are potato baskets below and raupo reed whare (house). Top right (II) is a more elaborately carved pataka painted in red ochre and decorated with feathers. The second layer is one watercolour comprising IV, V and VI. In between V anf IV is a pataka belonging to the paramount chief Te Heuheu Tukino Mananui II (left) and Rangihaeatta's pataka (right, VI). In between the two patakas is a wharepuni (sleeping house), gourds for carrying and storing water, and kete (basket) hanging from stakes would have contained kumera a sweet root vegetable. To the left (V) is a woman with an infant pounding flax fibre. In the top right hand corner of layer two is a kaka (parrot) on a perch. The third layer (III) are two pigs and an object.

Signed by Angas

Lithograph
The original has been used in Angas's The New Zealanders.

Lithograph caption: 'Whatas or Patukas. (Storeshouses for Food)'
Plate title: 'Whatas, or Patukas, storeshouses for food.'
Plate: XXX
Notes:
Lithographer: JW Giles

Iwi [Tribe]: Ngati Tuwharetoa, Ngati Toa, Tainui
Location: Taupo, Porirua, Te Pahe (Waharikeke River)

Former Accession Number 1613

  Creator George French Angas
Control AA 8/6/20
Date Range October 1844
Quantity 1 Watercolour 49.5x34.5cm; Mount 68.5x50.5cm
Inventory Identifier AA 8/6/20
Series AA8/06

AA 8/6/21

'Children at Pitoni.' 'A girl of Nga Ti Awa tribe' 'A boy of Nga Ti Awa tribe. at Te Aro Pa.' Port Nicholson. August 1844

 

Original Watercolour
There are three original watercolours within this frame. Captions are as follows:

  • 'Children at Pitoni. Port Nicholson. August 1844.'
  • 'A girl of Nga Ti Awa tribe Port Nicholson. aug 28th, 1844.'
  • 'A boy of Nga Ti Awa tribe. at Te Aro Pa. Port Nicholson. August 28th. 1844.'

Notes:

  • In the first watercolour on the left are two boys standing. The tallest boy on the left wears a red European blanket and a thick pake (rain cape). A smaller child on his right is smoking a pipe and and is wearing a Korowai-ngore (cloak) made with cylindrical thrumbs that have been scraped and dyed and woollen pompoms.
  • In the centre watercolour a girl stands wrapped in a shawl and cloak with coloured wool fringing and a shark tooth ear pendant.
  • In the third watercolour on the right a boy stands wrapped in a European blanket worn like a cloak. He stands in front of a fortified fence and a dog hide that has been stretched out on stakes to dry in the sun.

Signed by Angas on mount

Lithograph
Two of the originals have been used in Angas's The New Zealanders.

Lithograph caption:

  1. 'A girl at Pipitea Pah.'
  2. 'A boy of Te Aro.'
  3. 'E Rangi & E Tohi, girls of Port Nicholson. with Kiko an old woman of Tiakiwai.'

Plate title: 'Natives of Port Nicholson.'
Plate: XXXI (part)
Notes: Only the centre and right watercolours appear in the lithograph and all have been numbered I, II and III. The centre watercolour titled 'A girl of Nga Ti Awa tribe' is renamed 'I. A girl at Pipitea Pah.' The girl is reversed in the lithograph and to her left is a carved stile leading into a potato garden. The carved stile is repeated in Plate 50 (see AA 8/6/40). A basket hangs from a post. The right watercolour titled 'A boy of Nga Ti Awa tribe' is renamed 'II. A boy of Te Aro.' The boy is reversed in the lithograph.
Lithographer: GF Angas

Iwi [Tribe]: Ngati Awa
Location: Tiakiwai, Te Aro pa, Petone, Port Nicholson (Wellington)

Former Accession Number 1507

  Creator George French Angas
Control AA 8/6/21
Date Range 28 August 1844
Quantity 1 Watercolours I. 24x14cm; II. 23.5x13cm; III. 24x13.5cm; Mount 34.5x44.5cm
Inventory Identifier AA 8/6/21
Series AA8/06

AA 8/6/22

'Poahu son of Te Puhirua. Poverty Bay. E Kote. Son of Rangipati. A chief of Poverty Bay.'

 

Original Watercolour
There is one original watercolour within this frame.

Notes: Poahu is seated smoking a pipe. Hawk wings are attached to either side of his head with flax. He a korowai-ngore (cloak) made with black twisted thrumbs and fringing wears over a blue western shirt. Koti stands wearing a korowai-ngore made with black twisted thrumbs and has been stitched with coloured wool. He has hawk feathers on either side of his head with red ochre in his hair. From his right ear hangs a medal from the Jesuit mission.

Signed by Angas

Lithograph
The original has been used in Angas's The New Zealanders.

Lithograph caption: 'Poahu and E Koti. Two lads of Poverty Bay. Children of Te Pakaru, the principal chief of Kawhia.'
Plate title: 'Poahu and E Koti; Two lads of Poverty Bay. Children of Te Pakaru, the chief of Kaiohia.'
Plate: XXXIII
Notes:The lithograph comprises two watercolours, AA 8/6/22 and 23: Poahu and E Koti are on the left. See AA 8/6/23 for 'Children of Te Pakaru'.
Lithographer: GF Angas

Iwi [Tribe]:
Location: Poverty Bay

Former Accession Number 1522

  Creator George French Angas
Control AA 8/6/22
Date Range 1844
Quantity 1 Watercolour 27.5x21.5cm; Mount 35.5x29.5
Inventory Identifier AA 8/6/22
Series AA8/06

AA 8/6/23

'Powharo. daughter of Nga Mutu. Ngatimaniapoto tribe. Taraunahi. Juliana or Rangiteriwi. Children of Te Pakaru. Kawhia.'

 

Original Watercolour
There is one original watercolour within this frame.

Notes: There are three children: two standing and one sitting. Powharo, on the left, stands bare foot with red flowers in her hair, a greenstone (nephrite jade) ear pendant and wrapped in a kaitaka-ngore (cloak) that has a taniko border with a chevron pattern. Her sister Rangiteriwi also known as Juliana is seated and wears a similar kaitaka-ngore, a shark tooth ear pendant and a long feather in her hair. Their brother, Taraunahi, stands on the right and wears a pake (rain cape) which is a heavier garment made of undressed flax. In the background is palisade fencing surrounding a whare (house).

Signed by Angas0

Lithograph
The original has been used in Angas's The New Zealanders.

Lithograph caption: 'Poahu and E Koti. Two lads of Poverty Bay. Children of Te Pakaru, the principal chief of Kawhia.'
Plate title: 'Poahu and E Koti; Two lads of Poverty Bay. Children of Te Pakaru, the chief of Kaiohia.'
Plate: XXXIII
Notes: The lithograph comprises two watercolours, AA 8/6/22 and 23: 'Children of Te Pakaru' are on the right. See AA 8/6/22 for Poahu and E Koti.
Lithographer: GF Angas

Iwi [Tribe]: Ngati Maniapoto
Location: Kawhia

Former Accession Number 1523(3)

  Creator George French Angas
Control AA 8/6/23
Date Range 1844
Quantity 1 Watercolour 27x21cm; Mount 35.5x29cm
Inventory Identifier AA 8/6/23
Series AA8/06

AA 8/6/24

'Tara or Irirangi. Principal chief of the Ngatitai Tribe'

 

Original Watercolour
There is one original watercolour within this frame.

Notes: The Rangatira (chief) Tara or Irirangi was the principal chief of the Ngai Tai and stands holding a Tewhatewha (long handled fighting staff). He has a moko (traditional Maori facial tattoo) and wears a shark tooth in his right ear. Tara wears a korowai-ngore (cloak) made with black twisted muka (fibre extracted from flax) thrumbs, pompons and red woollen stitched patterns. In the background is a palisade fence.

Signed by Angas

Lithograph
The original has been used in Angas's The New Zealanders.

Lithograph caption: 'Tara.'
Plate title: 'Tara or Irirangi, principal chief of Nga Ti Tai tribe'
Plate: XXXIV
Notes:
Lithographer: GF Angas

Iwi [Tribe]: Ngai Tai or Ngati Tai
Location: Auckland

Former Accession Number 1508

  Creator George French Angas
Control AA 8/6/24
Date Range 1844
Quantity 1 Watercolour 33.5x24cm; Mount 44.5x34.5cm
Inventory Identifier AA 8/6/24
Series AA8/06

AA 8/6/25

'A feast. at Mata Ta. on the East Coast. Mt Edgecombe in the distance.' and 'A party of visitors. Throwing the spear. The mode of salutation.'

 

Original Watercolour
There are two original watercolours within this frame. Captions are as follows:

  1. 'A feast. at Mata Ta. on the East Coast. Mt Edgecombe in the distance.'
  2. 'A party of visitors. Throwing the spear. The mode of salutation.'

Notes:

  1. At the hakari (feast) neighbouring tribes are invited to participate, the event lasting for days or sometimes weeks. The large consumption of food at the hakari is referred to as hui. In this feast participants either sit or stand around a raised platform that stores dried fish and baskets full of kumera and potatoes. Whare (house) are in the background and in the distance is Putauaki (Mount Edgecumbe).
  2. When manuhiri (visitors) arrive from a neighbouring iwi (tribe) the tangata whenua (hosts) are expected to perform a powhiri or pohiri (welcome ceremony) which begins with taki or wero (one of the chiefs throwing a spear), in this case a taiaha (long club fighting staff). The ceremony is peformed in a cleared space in front of the pa (fortified village).

Signed by Angas

Lithograph
The original has been used in Angas's The New Zealanders.

Lithograph caption:
'

  1. A feast at Mata-Ta, on the East Coast Mt Edgecumbe in the distance.
  2. Throwing the spear, the mode of salutation A Party of Visitors arriving.
'
Plate title:
  • 'A feast at Mata-Ta. Mount Edgecumbe in the Distance.'
  • 'Throwing the spear. The mode of salutation.'

Plate: XXXVI
Notes:
Lithographer: JW Giles

Iwi [Tribe]:
Location: Matata, Maungataritari, beyond Waipa

Former Accession Number 1611

  Creator George French Angas
Control AA 8/6/25
Date Range 1844
Quantity 1 Watercolour 49.5x34.5cm; Mount 68.5x51cm
Inventory Identifier AA 8/6/25
Series AA8/06

AA 8/6/26

'Rihe his wife. To Nga Porutu. A chief of the Nga Ti Maniapoto. tribe. at Wakatumutumu. Mokau River.'

 

Original Watercolour
There is one original watercolour within this frame.

Notes: Ngaporutu is seated wearing a kakahu (cloak) with yellow and black tags. He has a moko (traditional Maori facial tattoo) and a greenstone (nephrite jade) pendant on his left ear. His wife Rihe seated to his left has a kauwae (traditional Maori woman's chin tattoo) and additional tattoos on her face. Rihe wears white gull feathers on her left ear and is wrapped in korowai-ngore (cloak) made with black dyed twisted thrumbs. In the background is a carved pataka (enclosed and elevated store house).

Signed by Angas

Lithograph
The original has been used in Angas's The New Zealanders.

Lithograph caption: 'To Ngaporutu, and his wife, Rihe. At Wakatumutu.'
Plate title: 'Nga Porutu and his wife Rihe. Mokau.'
Plate: XXXVII
Notes: The lithograph comprises two watercolours, AA 8/6/26 and 27: Nga Porutu and Rihe are on the left. See AA 8/6/27 for 'Nga Whea and Nga Miho'. Subtle changes to hair and facial features.
Lithographer: GF Angas

Iwi [Tribe]: Ngati Maniapoto
Location: Wakatumutumu, Mokau River

Former Accession Number 1522(3)

  Creator George French Angas
Control AA 8/6/26
Date Range October 1844 - October 1844
Quantity 1 Watercolour 27x22cm; Mount 35.5x29.5cm
Inventory Identifier AA 8/6/26
Series AA8/06

AA 8/6/27

'Nganiho (the teeth) wife of Rangituataea. Ngawhea. of Te Mahoa. a chief of Ngatimaniapoto. tribe. Ahuahu. Oct 1844.'

 

Original Watercolour
There is one original watercolour within this frame.

Notes: Whea a chief of Ngati Maniapoto is seated wearing a kakahu (cloak) made with thick strips of undressed flax. He has a moko (traditional Maori facial tattoo). Niho, wife of Rangituatea, sits beside him wrapped in a blanket worn like a cloak and has a kauwae (traditional Maori woman's chin tattoo).

Signed by Angas

Lithograph
The original has been used in Angas's The New Zealanders.

Lithograph caption: 'Ngawhea, or Te Mahoa. A chief of the Ngatimaniapoto tribe & Nga Miho wife of Rangituataea'
Plate title: 'Nga Whea and Nga Miho. Kawhia.'
Plate: XXXVII
Notes: The lithograph comprises two watercolours, AA 8/6/26 and 27: 'Nga Whea and Nga Miho' are on the right. See AA 8/6/26 for 'Nga Porutu and his wife Rihe. Mokau.' Subtle changes to hair and facial features.
Lithographer: GF Angas

Iwi [Tribe]: Ngati Maniapoto
Location: Ahuahu

Former Accession Number 1506

  Creator George French Angas
Control AA 8/6/27
Date Range October 1844
Quantity 1 Watercolour 27x22cm; Mount 35.5x29.5cm
Inventory Identifier AA 8/6/27
Series AA8/06

AA 8/6/28

'Entrance to a Warm House. in Rarowera. Pa. Waipa.'

 

Original Watercolour
There is one original watercolour within this frame.

Notes: This house is an example of simpler earlier architecture. A koruru (carved head) representing an ancestor is placed in the middle of the barge board that spans the porch. On each end of the barge board are carved spirals and beaked manaia (guardians). The amo (upright support post) which supports the barge board are carved figures. The house has a thatched roof and palisade posts.

Signed by Angas on mount

Lithograph
The original has been used in Angas's The New Zealanders.

Lithograph caption: 'Entrance to a house at Raroera Pah. Waipa'
Plate title: 'Entrance to a dwelling house at Raroera Pah.'
Plate: XXXVIII
Notes: Subtle differences in foreground.
Lithographer: JW Giles

Iwi [Tribe]: Tainui
Location: Raroera on the Waipa River in the Waikato district. Raoera not on modern maps

Former Accession Number 1618

  Creator George French Angas
Control AA 8/6/28
Date Range 1844
Quantity 1 Watercolour 25.5x33.5cm; Mount 40.5x53.5cm
Inventory Identifier AA 8/6/28
Series AA8/06

AA 8/6/29

New Zealand ornaments, embroidery, instruments and child

  IMAGE »
 

This item contains restricted material

Original Watercolour
There are seventeen original watercolours within this frame. Notes are as follows:

Notes:

  1. Pekapeka ear pendant.
  2. A rare example of a mako taniwa (tiger shark tooth) crafted from greenstone (nephrite jade).
  3. A small greenstone hei tiki neck pendant. This item was an offering at a Wahi tapu (sacred burial site) and therefore restricted.
  4. A large greenstone hei tiki neck pendant. This item was an offering at a Wahi tapu (sacred burial site) and therefore restricted.
  5. Kuru, a greenstone ear pendant
  6. Kapeu, a greenstone ear pendant
  7. Mako taniwa (tiger shark tooth) ear pendant worn by a person of rank
  8. The tail feather from a huia (Neomorpha Gouldii, bird) worn in the hair by chiefs or a person of rank
  9. Shell ear pendant worn by people of Cook Straight
  10. Heru (wooden comb) worn in the hair by warriors
  11. Heru (wooden comb) worn in the hair by warriors
  12. A child at Te Rapa Lake
  13. A fantail fly catcher (Rhipidura flabellifera) is worn hanging from the ear
  14. Head of a huia (Neomorpha Gouldii, bird) is worn hanging from the ear
  15. Example of an embroidered pattern on the border of a kaitaka-ngore (cloak). Women embroider with a bone needle and takes years to complete.
  16. Example of an embroidered pattern on the border of a kaitaka-ngore (cloak). Women embroider with a bone needle and takes years to complete.
  17. The number has been included but no watercolour

Signed by Angas

Lithograph
The original has been used in Angas's The New Zealanders.

Lithograph caption: 'Native Ornaments, &c.'
Plate title: 'New Zealand ornaments and decorations.'
Plate: XXXIX
Notes: Watercolour of two tattooing instruments have been added as number XXVII.
Lithographer: GF Angas

Iwi [Tribe]: Ngati Tuwharetoa
Location: Cook Strait, Te Rapa (Taupo)

Former Accession Number 1527(4)

  Creator George French Angas
Control AA 8/6/29
Date Range 1844
Quantity 1 Watercolour 49.5x34.5cm; Mount 57.5x42cm
Inventory Identifier AA 8/6/29
Series AA8/06

AA 8/6/30/1

'Te Ohu. A Tohunga or Priest of Nga Ti Maniapoto tribe. Waihariki River. Oct 1844.'

  IMAGE »
 

This item is restricted.

Original Watercolour
There is one original watercolour within this frame.

Notes: Te Ohu is seated wrapped in a blanket worn over a cloak. He has a moko (traditional Maori facial tattoo). In the background is a fenced wahi tapu (sacred burial site) which is restricted. This scene includes a waka whakamaumaharatanga (canoe cenotaph). Hanging from a staked post is a gourd for the storage of water and a kete (basket) sits on top.

Signed by Angas

Lithograph
The original has been used in Angas's The New Zealanders.

Lithograph caption: 'Te Ohu, a heathen priest. of the Ngatimaniapoto Tribe Ahuahu'
Plate title: 'Te Ohu. An old Tohunga or heathen priest.'
Plate: XLI
Notes: The lithograph comprises two watercolours, AA 8/6/30/1 and 30/2: Te Ohu is on the left. See AA 8/6/30/2 for 'Ko Tauwaki and Ko Teonionga.'
Lithographer: Louisa Hawkins

Iwi [Tribe]: Ngati Maniapoto
Location: Ahuahu

Former Accession Number:

  Creator George French Angas
Control AA 8/6/30/1
Date Range 1844
Formats Mounted Photographic Prints
Inventory Identifier AA 8/6/30/1
Series AA8/06

AA 8/6/30/2

'Ko Tau Whaki. A chief of Taupo. At Tukanu Kainga. Ko Teonionga. Son of Ko Kitea. A chief of Taupo.'

  IMAGE »
 

Original Watercolour
There is one original watercolour within this frame.

Notes: Ko Tauwhaki, a chief of Tokanu is seated and wears a korowai-ngore (cloak) made with black dyed twisted muka (fibre extracted from flax) thrumbs and fringing and a greenstone (nephrite jade) ear pendant. Ko Teongionga from Te Rapa, a relative of the Ngati Tuwharetoa paramount chief Te Heuheu Tukino (Mananui II) stands to his right. He has white gull feathers in his hair and wears a pake (rain cape) of rough flax that Angas notes as 'peculiar for the area'. In the background is a carved pataka (enclosed and elevated store house) and a palisade fence.

Signed by Angas

Lithograph
The original has been used in Angas's The New Zealanders.

Lithograph caption: 'Ko Tauwaki, a chief of Tukanu, Ko Teonionga, a boy of Te Rapa Taupo Lake'
Plate title: 'Ko Tauwaki and Ko Teonionga. Taupo.'
Plate: XLI
Notes: The lithograph comprises two watercolours, AA 8/6/30/1 and 30/2: Ko Tauwaki and Ko Teonionga are on the right. See AA 8/6/30/1 for 'Te Ohu. An old Tohunga or heathen priest.' Ko Teongionga's feet and Ko Tauwaki's face differ from watercolour.
Lithographer: GF Angas

Iwi [Tribe]: Ngati Tuwharetoa
Location:Tokaanu, Te Rapa,Taupo

Former Accession Number 1523 (4)

  Creator George French Angas
Control AA 8/6/30/2
Date Range 1844
Quantity 1 Watercolour 27.5x21.5cm; Mount 35.5x29.5cm
Inventory Identifier AA 8/6/30/2
Series AA8/06

AA 8/6/31

'The New Zealanders. IV.'

  IMAGE »
 

Original Watercolour
There are seven original watercolours within this frame. Captions and notes are as follows:

  1. 'Wakarei'
  2. 'Carved image of Te Rauparaha. Fixed in his war canoe. Kapiti.'
  3. no data
  4. 'Tauwakarei'
  5. 'Hohi pani'
  6. 'Ornamented canoe paddle. Taupo Lakes.'
  7. no data

Notes:

  1. A tauihu (bow figurehead) of a waka taua (war canoe) that belonged to the Rangatira (chief) Te Rauparaha. It is intricately carved and painted in kokowai (red ochre) and decorated with kaka (parrot) and albatross feathers.
  2. A waka taua carving.
  3. A group sailing a waka (canoe) in the Cook Strait.
  4. A carved bow figurehead from a waka taua at Kaiwharawhara.
  5. A carved bow figurehead from a waka taua at Kaiwharawhara.
  6. A hoe (paddle) that belonged to the paramount chief of Ngati Tuwharetoa Te Heuheu Tukino (Mananui II). They have been painted with the symbolic scrolled patterns referred to as kowhaiwhai.
  7. A hoe (paddle) that belonged to the paramount chief of Ngati Tuwharetoa Te Heuheu Tukino (Mananui II). They have been painted with the symbolic scrolled patterns referred to as kowhaiwhai.
  8. A detail from a paddle handle.

Signed by Angas

Lithograph
The original has been used in Angas's The New Zealanders.

Lithograph caption: 'Ornamental canoe heads, paddles, &c.'
Plate title: 'Canoe heads, paddles, &c.'
Plate: XLII
Notes: Lithograph reversed, renumbered and captions removed. Watercolour numbered I is unnumbered in the lithograph. II becomes I, III becomes VII, IV becomes III, V becomes IV, VI becomes V and VII becomes VI.
Lithographer: GF Angas

Iwi [Tribe]: Ngati Tuwharetoa, Ngati Toa
Location: Taupo, Cook's Straight, Kapiti, Kaiwharawhara

Former Accession Number 1578

  Creator George French Angas
Control AA 8/6/31
Date Range 1844
Quantity 1 Watercolour 39.5x34.5cm; Mount 69x51cm
Inventory Identifier AA 8/6/31
Series AA8/06

AA 8/6/32

'Te Maru A boy of Ko Ruakokopu. Waikato.'

 

Original Watercolour
There is one original watercolour within this frame.

Notes: Te Maru stands at Koruakopopo on the banks of the Waikato river. The son of a chief and estimated by Angas to be aproximately 16 years of age. He wears a pake (rain cape) made from undressed flax.

Signed by Angas

Lithograph
The original has been used in Angas's The New Zealanders.

Lithograph caption: 'I. Te Maru, a Boy of Koruakopopo, on the Waikato.'
Plate title: 'Te Maro. A boy of Waikato.'
Plate: XLIII
Notes: The lithograph comprises three watercolours, AA 8/6/32, 33 and 34: Te Maro is on the top left. See AA 8/6/33 for Te Amotutu and AA 8/6/34 for Ko Tariu.
Lithographer: GF Angas

Iwi [Tribe]: Tainui
Location: Koruakopopo, on the banks of the Waikato River

Former Accession Number 1524

  Creator George French Angas
Control AA 8/6/32
Date Range October 1844
Quantity 1 Watercolour 27.5x21cm; Mount 35.5x29.5cm
Inventory Identifier AA 8/6/32
Series AA8/06

AA 8/6/33

'Te Amotutu. A young chief of the Nga Ti Pou. Relation of Te Paki. Waikato. Oct 2'

 

Original Watercolour
There is one original watercolour within this frame.

Notes: Noted by Angas as a young man of aproximately 16. Te Amotutu stands wearing two kakahu (cloak): a mid length kahu kuri (dog skin cloak) with tuffs of white and dark coloured fur is worn over a korowai-ngore (cloak) that has black twisted thrumbs fringing, a chevron patterned taniko border, red woollen pompoms and stitched border. He wears ear pendants, one made out of greenstone (nephrite jade) in his right ear. Te Amotutu stands infront of a fence and in the background is a pataka (enclosed and elevated store house) and whare (house).

Signed by Angas

Lithograph
The original has been used in Angas's The New Zealanders. ;

Lithograph caption: 'II. Te Amotutu, a Young Chief of the Nga-ti-pou Tribe.'
Plate title: 'Te Amotutu, a young chief of the Nga-ti-pou Tribe.'
Plate: XLIII
Notes: The lithograph comprises three watercolours, AA 8/6/32, 33 and 34: Te Amotutu is on the top right. See AA 8/6/32 for Te Maro and AA 8/6/34 for Ko Tariu.
Lithographer: GF Angas

Iwi [Tribe]: Ngati Pou
Location: 50 miles further up the Waikato than Komakopopo

Former Accession Number 1523(2)

  Creator George French Angas
Control AA 8/6/33
Date Range 2 October 1844
Quantity 1 Watercolour 27.5x21.5cm; Mount 35.5x29.5cm
Inventory Identifier AA 8/6/33
Series AA8/06

AA 8/6/34

'Ko Tariu. A chief of Taupo. E Pori. His principal wife.'

  IMAGE »
 

Original Watercolour
There is one original watercolour within this frame.

Notes: Tariu lost his right eye in fighting against Wanganui. He has a moko (traditional Maori facial tattoo), a tuft of white feathers in his right ear and greenstone (nephrite jade) pendant in his left ear. Tariu sits wrapped in a kakahu (cloak) with black and yellow tags over a European blanket. He has a pipe in his mouth. His wife Pori lies to the right of Tariu and wears a korowai-ngore (cloak) with black twisted thrumbs and fringing. She has a tuft of white feathers in her left ear, a single white feather in her hair and tattooed lips.

Signed by Angas

Lithograph
The original has been used in Angas's The New Zealanders.

Lithograph caption: 'III. Ko Tariu, a Chief of Taupo, & and his principal wife, E Pori.'
Plate title: 'Ko Tariu. A chief of Taupo, with his wife.'
Plate: XLIII
Notes: The lithograph comprises three watercolours, AA 8/6/32, 33 and 34: Ko Tariu is on the bottom. See AA 8/6/32 for Te Maro and AA 8/6/33 for Te Amotutu. Subtle differences in face, hair and clothing.
Lithographer: GF Angas

Iwi [Tribe]: Ngati Tuwharetoa
Location: Taupo

Former Accession Number 1523(1)

  Creator George French Angas
Control AA 8/6/34
Date Range October 1844
Quantity 1 Watercolour 27.5x21.5cm; Mount 35.5x29.5
Inventory Identifier AA 8/6/34
Series AA8/06

AA 8/6/35

'Potatau or Te Whero-whero. Principal chief of all Waikato. Perongia Mt. Whata-whata. October 4. 1844.'

 

Original Watercolour
There is one original watercolour within this frame.

Notes: Potatau or Te Wherowhero was a noted warrior, leader and principal chief of Waikato. He is seated beside a log, wrapped in a blanket. He has a moko (traditional Maori facial tattoo) and wears a shark tooth in the left ear and greenstone (nephrite jade) pendant in the right. In the background are native foliage, a whare (house) with kete (basket) containing potatoes balancing on its roof. Te Wherowhero later became the first Maori king in 1858.

Signed by Angas

Lithograph
The original has been used in Angas's The New Zealanders.

Lithograph caption: 'Te Werowero, or Potatau. The principal chief of all Waikato.'
Plate title: 'Te Whero-whero, or Patuatu. The principal chief of all Waikato.'
Plate: XLIV
Notes: The lithograph comprises two watercolours, AA 8/6/35 and 36: Te Whero-Whero is on the left. See AA 8/6/36 for Te Waru and Te Pakuru. There are differences in the cloak, background, head, log and Te Whero-whero's foot has been included.
Lithographer: GF Angas

Iwi [Tribe]: Tainui
Location: Whatawhata, Waikato

Former Accession Number 1529(4)

  Creator George French Angas
Control AA 8/6/35
Date Range 4 October 1844 - 4 October 1844
Quantity 1 Watercolour 34x24cm; Mount 44.5x34.5cm
Inventory Identifier AA 8/6/35
Series AA8/06

AA 8/6/36

'Te Waru. Principal chief of Nga Ti Apakura tribe. Waipa. In council at Ahuahu. Te Pakaru or Haopokia. Principal chief of Nga Ti Maniapoto tribe. Waikato.'

 

Original Watercolour
There are two original watercolours within this frame.

Notes: Te Waru is seated to the left. He is wrapped in kaitaka-ngore (cloak) worn over a European blanket. The cloak is finally woven with a taniko border. The seated figure on his right is Te Pakaru who wears a korowai-ngore (cloak) made with black twisted thrumbs, cylindrical flax tags, and red and blue woollen pompoms. Both men have full moko (traditional Maori facial tattoo). Endorsed with their signatures.

Signed by Angas

Lithograph
The original has been used in Angas's The New Zealanders.

Lithograph caption: 'Te Waru principal chief of the Nga Ti Apakura tribe Te Pakaru, principal chief of the Nga Ti Maniapoto tribe'
Plate title: 'Te Whero-whero, or Patuatu. The principal chief of all Waikato.'
Plate: XLIV
Notes: The lithograph comprises two watercolours, AA 8/6/35 and 36: Te Waru and Te Pakuru are on the right. See AA 8/6/35 for Te Whero-Whero.
Lithographer: GF Angas

Iwi [Tribe]: Ngati Apakura, Ngati Maniapoto
Location: Ahuahu, Waipa

Former Accession Number 1621

  Creator George French Angas
Control AA 8/6/36
Date Range 1844
Quantity 1 Watercolour 33.5x24cm; Mount 53.5x40.5cm
Inventory Identifier AA 8/6/36
Series AA8/06

AA 8/6/37

'I. Weeping over a deceased chief near Mokau. II. A Tangi. or meeting of friends. Mount Egmont in the Distance.'

 

Original Watercolour
There are two original watercolours within this frame. Captions and notes are as follows:

  1. Weeping over a deceased chief near Mokau.'
  2. 'A tangi or meeting of friends. Mount Egmont in the Distance.'

Notes:

  1. The tangi or tangihanga (process of grieving when a chief or person of rank has died) lasts for several days. In this scene, the mourners gather around the tupapaku (deceased chief) who lies under the verandah of a meeting house. A pataka (enclosed and elevated store house) is in the background.
  2. At the tangi (meeting of friends) the visitors are greeted with the hongi. The hongi is where two people press their noses together an exchange the ha (breath of life). Mount Taranki (Mount Egmont) is in the background.

Signed by Angas

Lithograph
The original has been used in Angas's The New Zealanders.

The two original watercolours have been divided into two lithographs: the top watercolur is Plate XLV and the bottom watercolour is Plate LII.

Plate XLV
Lithograph caption: 'Weeping over a deceased chief.'
Plate title: 'Lamentation over a deceased chief.'
Notes: Subtle differences that includes use of shadows, facial features and hair.

Plate LII
Lithograph caption: 'A Tangi, or meeting of friends. Mount Egmont in the distance'
Plate title: 'The ceremony of ongi, or pressing noses.'
Notes: Subtle difference that includes hair, facial features and colour.

Lithographer: JW Giles

Iwi [Tribe]:
Location: Mokau, Taranaki

Former Accession Number 1610

  Creator George French Angas
Control AA 8/6/37
Date Range 1844
Quantity 1 Watercolour 49.5x34cm; Mount 68.5x51cm
Inventory Identifier AA 8/6/37
Series AA8/06

AA 8/6/38

Ornamental wood carvings

  IMAGE »
 

Original Watercolour
There are six original watercolours within this frame. Captions are as follows:

  1. 'Papa.'
  2. no data
  3. no data
  4. 'Cook's Strts'
  5. 'Papa.'
  6. no data
  7. no data

Signed by Angas

Notes:

  1. A papa (carved box) receives the tail feathers of the huia (Neomorpha Gouldii, bird). The feathers are worn by chiefs in ceremonies.
  2. Head of a 12 foot long carved wooden spear from the Ngati Awa iwi (tribe)
  3. A carving of Rangihaeata that was carved by himself. The carving forms the lower portion of the central pillar that supports the roof of his house called Kai Tangata (eat man) on Mana Island.
  4. A man sailing in a waka (canoe) in Port Nicholson (wellington)
  5. Another example of a papa. The box and it's contents are usually tapu (sacred) so only the owner can touch it.
  6. A carved stand for supporting tapu items consecrated to the dead. The stand was found amongst the ruins at Lake Taupo.
  7. A carved taurapa (stern post) from a waka taua (war canoe) from the Thames river.

Signed by Angas

Lithograph
The original has been used in Angas's The New Zealanders.

Lithograph caption: 'Ornamental carvings in wood.'
Plate title: 'Ornamental carvings in wood.'
Plate: XLVI
Notes: The watercolours have been renumbered: I becomes III, II becomes V, III becomes I, IV becomes VII, V becomes IV, VI remains the same and VII becomes II.
Lithographer: GF Angas

Iwi [Tribe]: Ngati Awa, Ngati Toa, Ngati Tuwharetoa
Location: River Thames, Taupo, Island of Mana, Port Nicholson (Wellington)

Former Accession Number 1616

  Creator George French Angas
Control AA 8/6/38
Date Range 1844
Quantity 1 Watercolour 39.5x24.5cm; Mount 68.5x50.5cm
Inventory Identifier AA 8/6/38
Series AA8/06

AA 8/6/39

'Wakauenuku. His little slave boy. Christian chief of Nga Ti Waoroa tribe. Waikato.'

 

Original Watercolour
There is one original watercolour within this frame.

Notes: Waka Te Karaka (Clark), a Christian chief, sits on a European chair. He wears a blue European coat, cream trousers and grey shoes and has a moko (traditional Maori facial tattoo). Wakauenuku, his attendant, stands to his left and wears a pake (rain cape). Endorsed with Wakauenuku's signature.

Signed by Angas

Lithograph
The original has been used in Angas's The New Zealanders.

Lithograph caption: 'Ko Nga Waka Te Karaka, (or Clark) the Christian chief of the Nga-ti-Waoroa tribe, Waikato. and Wakauenuku, his attendant boy'
Plate title: 'Ko Nga Waka Te Karaka, a Christian chief of Wakato, with his attendant boy.'
Plate: XLVII
Notes:
Lithographer: GF Angas

Iwi [Tribe]: Ngati Waoroa
Location: Waikato

Former Accession Number 1530(3)

  Creator George French Angas
Control AA 8/6/39
Date Range 1844
Quantity 1 Watercolour 34x24cm; Mount 44.5x34.5cm
Inventory Identifier AA 8/6/39
Series AA8/06

AA 8/6/40

'The New Zealanders. XI.'

  IMAGE »
 

This item contains restricted material.

Original Watercolour
There are four original watercolours within this frame. Captions and notes are as follows:

'The New Zealanders. XI.'

  1. 'Wakapokoko near Roto-Aire Lake.'
  2. 'Carved stile. near Roto-Aire Lake.'
  3. 'Land mark. between Mokau and Tahua.'
  4. 'Wakapokokos or He Tikis round Waitahanui Pa. Taupo Lake./li>

Notes:

  1. A carved tiki (image). In the background is a whata (elevated storehouse) that contains the bones of a favourite child. This site is wahi tapu (sacred burial site) which is restricted.
  2. The carved stile leads into a potato garden.
  3. The boundry marker consists of a cloak tied to wooden entrance.
  4. The carved figures on palisade posts were often representations of ancestors or important atua (deities) and seen as guardians against misfortune.

Signed by Angas

Lithograph
The original has been used in Angas's The New Zealanders.

Plate XXXI (part)
Lithograph caption:

  1. 'A girl at Pipitea Pah.'
  2. 'A boy of Te Aro.'
  3. 'E Rangi & E Tohi, girls of Port Nicholson. with Kiko an old woman of Tiakiwai.'

Plate title: 'Natives of Port Nicholson.'
Notes: 'Carved stile. near Roto-Aire Lake.' (II) was used in the background of Plate XXXI, I. A girl at Pipitea Pah.' (see AA 8/6/21)

Plate L (part)
Lithograph caption: 'Native tombs.'
Plate title: 'Tombs.'
Notes: 'I. Wakapokoko near Roto-Aire Lake.' is the central watercolour in Plate L.

The remaining watercolours III and IV are unpublished.
Lithographer: JW Giles

Iwi [tribe]: Ngati Tuwharetoa,
Location: Rotoaire, Taupo, Mokau

Former Accession Number 1527(2)

  Creator George French Angas
Control AA 8/6/40
Date Range 1844
Quantity 1 Watercolour 49.5x34.5cm; Mount 57.5x42cm
Inventory Identifier AA 8/6/40
Series AA8/06

AA 8/6/41

'The New Zealanders. X. Tombs of Cooks Strts'

 

This item is restricted.

Original Watercolour
There are five original watercolours within this frame. Captions and notes are as follows:

'The New Zealanders. X. Tombs of Cooks Strts'

  1. Mausoleum of E Tohi. Mother of Rauparaha. on Mana Island, Cook's Strts. Porapora bush.'
  2. 'Monument near Cloudy Bay.'
  3. 'Monument at Tory Channel'
  4. 'Waitura. Widow by Tariki. Paripari. A widow of Nga Ti Awa trb. during mourning.'
  5. 'Native tomb at Te Awa Iti. Queen Charlotte's Sound.'

Signed by Angas

Notes: The sites are wahi tapu (sacred burial site) which is restricted. Each iwi (tribe), hapu (sub tribe) and whanau (family) group will have their own definition of what this means to them.

  1. The fenced papatupapaku (monument) of Tohi has been decorated with Kowhaiwhai (traditional scrolled pattern). The chevron patterned taniko border of a mat can be seen hanging over the box which conceals the body.
  2. A waka whakamaumaharatanga (canoe cenotaph) from Queen Charlotte Sound, South Island
  3. A waka whakamaumaharatanga (canoe cenotaph) from Te Awaiti, Cloudy Bay, South Island.
  4. A widow from Ngati Awa in mourning with self-inflicted cuts on her arms and face and wears a wreath of Kawakawa leaves around her head.
  5. This monument is for three children and has been decorated with a speckled scrolled pattern known as as Kowhaiwhai.

Lithograph
The original has been used in Angas's The New Zealanders.

Lithograph caption: 'Native Tombs.'
Plate title: 'Tombs.'
Plate: L
Notes: The centre watercolour IV has been replaced by watercolour I from AA 8/6/40.
Lithographer: JW Giles

Iwi [tribe]: Ngati Awa, Ngati Awa Iti,
Location: Mana Island, Cook's Strait, Cloudy Bay, Paripari, Queen Charlotte Sound, Tariki, Tory Channel, Waitura.

Former Accession Number 1527(1)

  Creator George French Angas
Control AA 8/6/41
Date Range 1844
Quantity 1 Watercolour 49.5x34cm; Mount 47.5x42cm
Inventory Identifier AA 8/6/41
Series AA8/06

AA 8/6/42/1

'Paora Muriwenua. Aotea'

 

Original Watercolour
There is one original watercolour within this frame.

Notes: Muriwenua stands wrapped in a rich brown and striped kahu kuri (dog skin cloak) worn over a European blanket. He has a moko (traditional Maori facial tattoo) and holds a taiaha (long club fighting staff) decorated with kaka (parrot) feathers. In the background is a pa (fortified village) alongside a harbour with a pataka (enclosed and elevated store house) and beached waka (canoe).

Signed by Angas

Lithograph
The original has been used in Angas's The New Zealanders.

Lithograph caption: 'Muriwhenua. Kahawai.'
Plate title: 'Muriwenua and Kahawai'
Plate: LI
Notes: The lithograph comprises two watercolours, AA 8/6/42/1 and 42/2: Muriwenua is on the left. See AA 8/6/42/2 for Kahawai.
Lithographer: JW Giles

Iwi [Tribe]:
Location: Aotea

Former Accession Number:

  Creator George French Angas
Control AA 8/6/42/1
Date Range 1844
Formats Mounted Photographic Prints
Inventory Identifier AA 8/6/42/1
Series AA8/06

AA 8/6/42/2

'Kahawai or Pugnarehu. Principal chief of Nga Ti Hinetu. at Nahuruhuru. Waipa.'

 

Original Watercolour
There is one original watercolour within this frame.

Notes: Kahawai or Pungarehu a chief of Ngati Hinetu stands wearing a stripped kahu kuri, (dog skin cloak) worn over a European blanket. He has a moko (traditional Maori facial tattoo) and holds in his right hand a mere pounamu (greenstone hand club) and wears a greenstone (nephrite jade) ear pendant in his right ear. Behind him is a Maori meeting house and part of a staked fence.

Signed by Angas

Lithograph
The original has been used in Angas's The New Zealanders.

Lithograph caption: 'Muriwhenua. Kahawai.'
Plate title: 'Muriwenua and Kahawai'
Plate: LI
Notes: The lithograph comprises two watercolours, AA 8/6/42/1 and 42/2: Kahawai is on the right. See AA 8/6/42/1 for Muriwenua.
Lithographer: JW Giles

Iwi [Tribe]: Ngati Hinetu
Location: Ngahuruhuru, Waipa not far from the place of the deserted pa Raroera

Former Accession Number 1493

  Creator George French Angas
Control AA 8/6/42/2
Date Range 1844
Quantity 1 Watercolour 33.5x24cm; Mount 44.5x34.5cm
Inventory Identifier AA 8/6/42/2
Series AA8/06

AA 8/6/43

'I. A Maori Native Swing. II. Natives dancing their war dance before the Pa of Hoinemutu at Roturua Lakes.'

  IMAGE »
 

Original Watercolour
There are two original watercolours within this frame. Captions and notes are as follows:

  1. 'A Maori or native swing.'
  2. 'Natives dancing their war dance before the Pa of Hoinemutu at Roturua Lakes.'

Notes:

  1. The swing is a popular recreational activity in the villages around Taupo. The centre pole with flax cords is fixed into the ground off a sloping bank. Participants run and swing backwards and forwards into the air, sometimes in a circular motion. A group of spectators have gathered in the foreground. In the background is a palisade fence and a raupo reed whare (house).
  2. A group of warriors is assembled on the outskirts of Ohinemu pa (fortified village) in Rotorua. A group of warriors perform a haka (traditional dance). They hold waka (canoe) paddles above their heads and some have traditional Maori tattoo on their buttocks and thighs. A group of spectators have gathered around the lake shoreline next to beached waka tete (fishing canoe) and a waka taua (war canoe) is tied to a post.

Signed by Angas

Lithograph
The original has been used in Angas's The New Zealanders.

Lithograph caption: 'I. Native swing. II. War Dance, before the Pah of Oinemutu near Roturua Lake.'
Plate title: 'Maori or Native Swing. War-Dance.'
Plate: LIII
Notes: Frames reversed in the plate.
Lithographer: JW Giles

Iwi [Tribe]: Ngati Tuwharetoa, Ngati Whakaue, Te Arawa
Location: Taupo, Ohinemutu pa (Rotorua)

Former Accession Number 1615

  Creator George French Angas
Control AA 8/6/43
Date Range 1844
Quantity 1 Watercolour 49.5x34.5cm; Mount 68.5x50.5cm
Inventory Identifier AA 8/6/43
Series AA8/06

AA 8/6/44

'Toea. Eldest daughter of Te Awaitaia. Principal chief of Ngatimahanga tribe. Wangaroa. tribe. Native boy carrying water.'

 

Original Watercolour
There is one original watercolour within this frame.

Notes: Toea, the daughter of Te Awaitaia (William Naylor) stands wearing a kakahu (cloak) with red woollen pompoms and red and green woolen fringing. Angas notes that the dark purple stripes came from the use of hinau (a natural bark dye). Toea's attendant approaches from between one of the pallisade avenues. He wears a folded garment wrapped around his waist with blue, red and yellow wool fringing. He carries a gourd used for transporting and storing water. The Whaingaroa harbour is in the background.

Signed by Angas

Lithograph
The original has been used in Angas's The New Zealanders.

Lithograph caption: 'Toea, daughter of Te Awaitaia, chief of Waingaroa. with an attendant boy, carrying water.'
Plate title: 'Toea and slave boy.'
Plate: LIV
Notes:
Lithographer: GF Angas

Iwi [Tribe]: Ngati Mahanga, Tainui
Location: Whaingaroa, Waikato

Former Accession Number 1530(4)

  Creator George French Angas
Control AA 8/6/44
Date Range 1844
Quantity 1 Watercolour 34x24cm; Mount 44.5x34.5cm
Inventory Identifier AA 8/6/44
Series AA8/06

AA 8/6/45

The New Zealanders. VII.'

  IMAGE »
 

Original Watercolour
There are thirteen original watercolous within this frame. Captions and notes are as follows:

'The New Zealanders. VII.'

  1. Fishing on Taupo Lake
  2. Patuna or native weir for fish. Mokau.
  3. An aged slave woman at Pouketuti.
  4. no data
  5. He Kumeti. Ancient wooden pot.
  6. no data
  7. no data
  8. no number and no data
  9. no data
  10. no number and no data
  11. no data
  12. no data
  13. no data
  14. no data

Signed by Angas

Notes:

  1. Fishing with nets on Lake Taupo
  2. Pa tuna (eel weir) on the river Mokau
  3. A wooden fish hook
  4. A wooden fish hook made with paua (sea snail) shell, human bone and kiwi feathers
  5. Hinaki (eel trap)
  6. A ko (wooden digging stick) used to loosen the soil
  7. A patu muka (flax fibre beater)
  8. A koauau (wooden flute). One of the holes is decorated with a design based on kauwae (traditional Maori woman's chin tattoo)
  9. A patua (bark basket) and gourds used to carry and store water
  10. A flax kete (basket)
  11. A kumete (ancient wooden bowl) for kumeras from the deserted pa (fortified village) of Otawhao, near Waipa
  12. Flax sandles from Otago
  13. Flax sandles from Otago
  14. Portrait of an aged slave woman at Pouketouto

Lithograph
The original has been used in Angas's The New Zealanders.

Lithograph caption: 'Implements & domestic economy.'
Plate title: 'Implements and domestic economy.'
Plate: LV
Notes:
Lithographer: GF Angas

Iwi [Tribe]: Ngati Tuwharetoa, Ngati Maniapoto, Ngati Rakei
Location: Taupo, Mokau River, Otawhao (Waipa), Otago, Pouketauto (Waitomo District)

Former Accession Number 1527(3)

  Creator George French Angas
Control AA 8/6/45
Date Range 1844
Quantity 1 Watercolour 49.5x34.5cm; Mount 57.5x42cm
Inventory Identifier AA 8/6/45
Series AA8/06

AA 8/6/46

'Te Heuheu Mananui or Tukino. Principal chief of all Taupo. at Te Rapa. Taupo Lake. Hiwikau or Nga Papa. Brother of Heuheu.'

 

Original Watercolour
There is one original watercolour within this frame.

Notes: Te Heuheu Tukino (Mananui II), paramount chief of Ngati Tuwharetoa, is seated on the left. He wears a greenstone (nephrite jade) hei tiki pendant around his neck, greenstone ear pendants in both ears and a cluster of blue feathers in the right. He also holds a prized mere pounamu (greenstone hand club) noted by Angas as 'the largest he had seen'. He is wrapped in a korowai-ngore (cloak) made with dyed twisted thrumbs. Te Heuheu Tukino's younger brother, Iwakau, is seated behind him to the right on a rock. Iwakau wears huia (Neomorpha Gouldii, bird) feathers in his hair and a black and yellow tihetihe. Both men have moko (traditional Maori facial tattoo). Part of the palisade fencing can be seen in the background along with a waka tete (fishing canoe) on the lake and people at the shore.

Signed by Angas

Lithograph
The original has been used in Angas's The New Zealanders.

Lithograph caption: 'Te Heuheu & Hiwikaw Tanpo.'
Plate title: 'Te Kawaw and his nephew, Te Heuheu, and Hiwikaw.'
Plate: LVI (part)
Notes: The lithograph comprises two watercolours. AA 8/6/46 is on the left. The watercolour on the right, 'Te Kawaw & his nephew Orakai' is not held by the South Australian Museum Archives.
Lithographer: JW Giles

Iwi [Tribe]: Ngati Tuwharetoa
Location: Te Rapa, Lake Taupo

Former Accession Number 1522

  Creator George French Angas
Control AA 8/6/46
Date Range October 1844
Quantity 1 Watercolour 27x21.5cm; Mount 35.5x29.5cm
Inventory Identifier AA 8/6/46
Series AA8/06

AA 8/6/47

'The New Zealanders. VIII. War.'

  IMAGE »
 

Original Watercolour
There are fourteen original watercolours with in this frame. Captions and notes are as follows:

'The New Zealanders. VIII. War.'
I - XII have no data
XIII. 'War bell Otawhao'
XIV. 'Pahu'

Notes:

  1. A carved toki poutangata (ceremonial adze) with a greenstone (nephrite jade) head, decorated with dogs' hair and kaka (parrot) feathers from the South Island
  2. Patiti (hatchett)
  3. Patiti (hatchett) belonging to Pomara, the Chatham Island chief
  4. A wooden dagger from the interior, near Tuhua
  5. A taiaha (long club fighting staff)
  6. A taiaha (long club fighting staff)
  7. Detail of a taiaha (long club fighting staff)
  8. A tewhatewha (long handled fighting staff) decorated with kaka (parrot) feathers
  9. Warriors preparing for battle
  10. A wooden wahaika (hand club)
  11. A Mere pounamu (greenstone hand club)
  12. A patu pararo (whalebone hand club)
  13. Hitting the pahu (slotted gong drum); warbell
  14. A pahu (slotted gong drum)

Signed by Angas

Lithograph
The original has been used in Angas's The New Zealanders.

Lithograph caption: 'Weapons & implements of war. Warriors preparing for a fight.'
Plate title: 'Weapons and implements of war: warriors preparing for a fight.'
Plate: LVIII
Notes: The lithograph has added a pukaea (long trumpet) as no. XV.
Lithographer: JW Giles

Iwi [Tribe]: Ngati Tuwharetoa
Location: Chatam Island, Tuhua, Owtea on the Thames, Taupo

Former Accession Number 1612

  Creator George French Angas
Control AA 8/6/47
Date Range 1844
Quantity 1 Watercolour 50x34cm; Mount 57.5x42cm
Inventory Identifier AA 8/6/47
Series AA8/06

AA 8/6/48

'The New Zealanders. XII.'

 

Original Watercolour
There is one original watercolour within this frame. Captions and notes are as follows:

The New Zealanders XII

  1. 'Ongi'
  2. 'Old woman at Te Mutu making basket of the leaves of Freycinetia banksii.'
  3. 'Slave preparing food.'
  4. 'Interior of a house at Rangihiaeta's pa. Woman making mats.'
  5. 'Tangi. On Waikato River near Taupiri.'
  6. 'Ongi.'

Notes:

  1. The cook house is at Kaitote on the Waikato River. Two women are in the foreground greeting each other with a hongi.
  2. An elderly woman weaves tawara (Freycinetia banksii or kiekie plant) into a basket.
  3. A women is scraping potatoes with a mussel shell.
  4. Two women weaving in a house at Rangihaeata pa [fortified village] in Porirua.
  5. When two women greet they tangi (welcome cry) and then Hongi.
  6. Two women at Taupiri on the Waikato River are performing a hongi (pressing noses) which follows a tangi.

Signed by Angas

Lithograph
The original has been used in Angas's The New Zealanders.

Lithograph caption: 'Domestic sketches.'
Plate title: 'Domestic economy: women making mats, &c.'
Notes. The watercolours are unnumbered. The captions are as follows:

  • 'Ongi'
  • 'Old woman at Te Muto, making baskets of the leaves of Freycinetia Banksh.'
  • 'Slave preparing food'
  • 'Interior of a house at Rangihireta's Pah (woman making mats)'
  • 'Fangi'
  • 'Ongi'

Plate: LIX
Lithographer: JW Giles

Iwi [tribe]: Tainui
Location: Kaitote, Te Mutu, Porirua, Taupiri

Former Accession Number 1608

  Creator George French Angas
Control AA 8/6/48
Date Range 1844
Quantity 1 Watercolour 49.5x34cm; Mount 68x50cm
Inventory Identifier AA 8/6/48
Series AA8/06

AA 8/6/49

'Hinenuitepo. The woman. Tauwhaki. Child. A tiki. At Rarowera Pa 15 feet. Maui. The Man.'

 

Original Watercolour
There is one original watercolour within this frame.

Notes: This carved tiki (image) painted in kokowai (red ochre) stands within close proximity to the tomb of Te Wherowhero's daughter and was noted by Angas as being aproximately 15 feet high. In the background are harakeke (flax) plants in flower and a fence.

Signed by Angas

Lithograph
The original has been used in Angas's The New Zealanders.

Lithograph caption: 'A tiki, at Raroera Pah.'
Plate title: 'Colossal tiki at Raroera Pah.'
Notes: The lithograph is reversed.
Plate: LX
Lithographer: GF Angas

Iwi [Tribe]: Tainui
Location: Raroera pa, on the Waipa River in the Waikato district

Former Accession Number 1622

  Creator George French Angas
Control AA 8/6/49
Date Range 1844
Quantity 1 Watercolour 33x25.5cm; Mount 53.5x40.5cm
Inventory Identifier AA 8/6/49
Series AA8/06