AA 346  Board for Anthropological Research  Guide to Records
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Series List and Summary Descriptions
AA 346  Board for Anthropological Research

AA346/01

Minutes, associated papers and correspondence relating to the Board for Anthropological Research meetings, 1933-1975.

 

This series comprises minutes, correspondence and some associated papers relating to the Board for Anthropological Research, a Board made up of members from the South Australian Museum and the University of Adelaide (South Australia). The papers appear to come from the collections of various individuals, including Norman B Tindale (see AA 338), Herbert M Hale (see AA 124) and Graeme Pretty (see AA 255).

  Date Range 1933 - 1975, some items are undated
Quantity 8.5 cm, 1 type 2 box
Provenance Board for Anthropological Research

AA346/02

Notes, proofs, bibliographies and publications and lecture drafts by the Board for Anthropological Research members, 1939-1966.

 

This series comprises proofs and some illustrations for chapters of Bernard C Cotton (editor, see SAMA 892), 1966, Aboriginal Man in South and Central Australia: Part 1; a clipping from the Adelaide University Gazette, 957, by John B Cleland (see AA 60) on The Board for Anthropological Research and notes by Norman B Tindale (see AA 338) on the same topic; lecture notes for two series of lectures by Clement Antrobus Harris; and a bibliography.

  Date Range 1939 - 1966
Quantity 18 cm, 1 type 1.1 box
Provenance Board for Anthropological Research

AA346/03

Papers relating to the Board for Anthropological Research expeditions, 1923-1939.

 

This series comprises papers relating to a number of Board for Anthropological Research (BAR) expeditions within Australia between 1923 and 1939. The papers have been grouped chronologically by expedition, but the content and quantity of papers varies, and papers do not exist for all BAR expeditions undertaken during this period. Papers in this series include reports, notes, lists, correspondence, notebooks, photographic prints prepared for publications, and records of physical anthropology data in the form of notes, tables, sketches, draft cards and finger, hand and foot prints. There are also some papers relating to method for physical measurement and observation (anthropometry).

A major purpose of BAR expeditions in this period was the collection of physical anthropology (anthropometric) data; and many of the items in this series are documentation of that research. The practice developed by BAR members of allocating numbers to individuals examined during each expedition (here referred to as 'individual subject numbers') is reflected in these papers. Individuals can be identified by name by reference to data cards in series AA 346/4.

  Date Range 1923 - 1939
Quantity 30 cm, 5 A3 Albox folders
Provenance Board for Anthropological Research

AA346/04

Sociological, Anthropological, Vital Statistics and ACER data recorded onto cards by Board for Anthropological Research expedition members, 1923-1963.

 

Series AA 346/4 comprises 23 numbered metal file drawers containing cards on which data has been recorded. The cards measure 20.5 cm x 12.7 cm (5 x 8 inches).

The data recorded on these cards is the results of observations, measurements, enquiries and tests by members of the Board for Anthropological Research (BAR) expedition teams. The Australian Aboriginal people encountered or gathered on a particular expedition were the subjects of the BAR's research. For discussion of the BAR's operations, research interests and methodology, see: PG Jones, 1987, 'South Australian anthropological history: the Board for Anthropological research and its early expeditions', Records of the South Australian Museum, 20: 71-92.

Within Series AA 346/4, cards are ordered by BAR expedition, with the exception of some groups of cards relating to South Australia which are located at the beginning of the series. From the late 1920s, cards are further grouped into 'Sociological Data' and 'Anthropological Data'. Typically, the Sociological Data cards record information about an individual including names, birthplace, age, sex, tribe/language group, and similar data about the individual's close kin, as well as photographs of the individual. Anthropological data cards record basic individual details and a range of physical measurements and observations ('anthropometric data'). Note that the format of the data cards varies over time, as does the range of measurements, observations, and enquiries undertaken. Note that not all data recorded on cards was recorded at the time of an expedition - some sets appear to have been compiled later from published data. Many cards have later annotations (especially relating to tribal/language group names). The data on the cards has been recorded by various hands. Note also that cards in any given series have been completed to varying levels of detail.

The method adopted by BAR expeditions to undertake research and record the results involved assigning a unique number to each individual (here called 'individual subject number'). This number was given the expedition symbol as a prefix, and remained consistent throughout the research (for example: D24). Cards within each series are ordered by these numbers. The numerical sequence usually begins with the men of a group, followed by the women, and finally children. In general, there is more data recorded on the men.

These cards are a primary reference for understanding the BAR's work.They are also a primary reference for identifying individuals who were subjects of the BAR's research, and cross-references can be made using (individual subject) numbers to other information collected by BAR members, including genealogies (AA 346/5), papers, entries in journals and so on.

Note that the data cards contain many variant spellings of tribal/language group names, some of which appear to have been recorded in the field, and some of which have been added or amended at a later date, often by NB Tindale (see AA 338). In the descriptions here the various terms and spellings have been reproduced, with what appear to be amendments noted in square brackets. It has not been possible in all cases to supply corresponding tribal/language group names according to standardised spellings adopted by NB Tindale (see AA 338) and AIATSIS (Australian Institute of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Studies). Note that the language group of the numbered individual is listed in the inventory descriptions which follow; some cards also include this information for kin of the individual.

Note that some draft data cards are in Series AA 346/3.

Note also that there are data cards in the Birdsell collection, AA 689/9. As these cards contain differing data from those in AA 346/4, comparison of the relevant sets is recommended.

  Date Range 1923 - 1963
Quantity 0.1 cm, 24 metal file drawers
Provenance Board for Anthropological Research

AA346/05

Genealogical data recorded by Board for Anthropological Research expedition members, 1928-1966.

 

This series comprises genealogies and genealogical notes recorded on Board for Anthropological Research expeditions, as well as some genealogies collected on other expeditions.

The genealogies record data elicted from Australian Aboriginal informants. The genealogies in this series were collected by NB Tindale (see AA 338), PJ Epling, JB Birdsell (see AA 689) and A Gordon.

The genealogies are in various formats; however, most are recorded on double sheets of foolscap paper which have later been bound into volumes. The genealogies generally record a number of generations, including that of the informant (with individual subject number), information including names, birthdate, birthplace, place of death, 'tribe', and section, as well as information about life history, and sometimes other notes.

This series is arranged chronologically by expedition, with the exception of AA 346/5/5, which is listed as previously bound into a single volume, and AA 346/5/10. Within each item, the genealogies are organised by the place at which the data was recorded.

Language groups noted on the genealogies have not been reproduced here; they may be checked by referring to the relevant listing of Board for Anthropological Research data cards (AA 346/4).

  Date Range 1928 - 1966
Quantity 127 cm,
Provenance Board for Anthropological Research

AA346/06

Copies of sociological data card photographs

  Provenance Board for Anthropological Research

AA346/09

Films recorded during the Board for Anthropological Research expeditions, 1926-1966.

 

THIS SERIES CONTAINS RESTRICTED MATERIAL
This series comprises films documenting the Board for Anthropological Research (BAR) expeditions throughout Australia between 1926-1966. These films record the scientific field research of the BAR members in their studies of Australian Aboriginal people, their culture, beliefs, relationship to the land and their environment.

Produced for educational purposes and commercially sold and loaned to individuals and institutions as a teaching tool, copies of these films exist in institutions throughout Australia and overseas. All permission to access or use BAR films should be directed to the South Australian Museum Archives (SAMA) Access Officer.

Numerous BAR members were the cinematographer of these films including: TD Campbell (AA 52), FA Jeffrey (AA 155), EO Stocker (AA 311), NB Tindale (AA 338), CP Mountord (AA 228), HK Fry (AA 105), EC Black (AA 31), FJ Fenner (AA 91), HJ Wilkinson (AA 370), JC Dobbie, J Simpson, MJ Barrett, R Edwards (AA 83), H Beyron and AA Abbie (AA 688). All BAR films previously accessioned into these collections have been transferred into the BAR film collection.

The film collection consists of 35mm nitrate film and 16mm acetate safety film. In 1979 the SAMA deposited its nitrate films with the National Film and Sound Archive (NFSA) for cold storage. The complex history of the nitrate films has been documented in Correspondence and Research folders (AA 346/9/27/9/1-3). The SAMA Master Preservation Tapes contains the best quality copies from both NFSA and SAMA film collections.

The film series has been ordered chronologically by BAR Expedition, with the exception of films made at Yuendumu and Haasts Bluff between 1951-1965. A number of the films produced by TD Campbell during these years includes footage shot between the years 1956-1958. Primary resource material on these films is very few so the decision was made to follow the old BAR film catalogue order of C1-C11, followed by partly processed films.

Note that not all BAR expeditions have films and that some BAR expeditons have numerous film titles.

Up until 1950 all BAR films are black and white, silent with intertitles. After 1950 all BAR films are colour, silent or colour with sound.

In the time coded summary all film intertitles have been italicised and are within quotation marks. All spelling within intertitles have been left as originally spelt. Language and terms which reflect the author's attitude or that of the period in which the item was produced may be considered inappropriate today.

The method adopted by BAR expeditions to undertake research and record the results involved assigning a unique number to each individual (here called 'individual subject number'). This number was given the expedition symbol as a prefix, and remained consistent throughout the research. Each expedition was assigned the symbol, and individuals recorded during that expedition were assigned an individual subject number, for example [C2]. Where possible the name and 'individual subject number' of those who appear in film have been noted and can be used to cross-reference information relating to a named individual across different Board for Anthropological Research series, expeditions and related collections.

To facilitate further research the film summaries also contain reference to associated SAMA collections, for example TD Campbell (AA 52), and SAM Registry numbers, for example the canoe made during the Harvard Adelaide film is noted as SAM Registry number (A27479).

  Date Range 1926 - 1966, date of expeditions
Quantity 0.1 cm
Provenance Board for Anthropological Research

AA346/10

Crayon drawings relating to the MacDonald Downs expedition, Northern Territory, 1930.

Board for Anthropological Research Expedition F

 

This series comprises drawings by Aboriginal people that were commissioned by members of the Board for Anthropological Research party whilst on expedition. The process is best described by Charles Pearcy Mountford in 'Aboriginal Crayon Drawings', Records of the South Australian Museum, Vol. 6, pp 1-28: 'Sheets of brown wrapping paper, approximately 50 cm. by 30 cm., were distributed, together with [red, yellow, black and white] crayons..it was especially desired that nothing external should influence the choice either of the subject, the colours chosen or the method of drawing'. The Aboriginal person 'was asked only to make marks (walka) on his paper'. (p5)

Mountford adds that intitially 'simple drawings of everyday things of aboriginal life were made, such as kangaroos, emus, trees, camps and waterholes' but after a week, confidence was gained and 'drawings relating to the travels and exploits of the aborginal's mythical ancestors began to be produced by the older man. From that time onward, no difficulty was experienced in obtaining designs, in fact, it was unfortunate that, as only a limited amount of time was available for interpretation of the detail, and the recording of the data, the distribution of sheets had to be curtailed.' (p6)

Each artist was identified by their data card identifier: see AA 346/4/12

Drawing collected and annotated by: Norman Tindale and Dr Robert Pulleine

For further information see:

  • 'Anthropological Expedition to MacDonald Downs, Central Australia. Journal and field notes by Norman B. Tindale. Aug. - Sept. 1930. Adelaide, South Australia. 1930.' (AA 338/1/6)
  • Sutton, Peter, 1998, 'Aboriginal Maps and Plans', The History of Cartography, volume Two, Book Three, Cartography in the Traditional African, American, Artic, Australian, and Pacific Societies, David Woodward and G Malcolm Lewis (editors), The University of Chicago Press, pp 387-416.

  Date Range 1930, some items are undated
Quantity 100 cm, 21 crayon drawings in 1 archive box
Provenance Board for Anthropological Research

AA346/11

Crayon drawings relating to the Cockatoo Creek expedition, Northern Territory, 1931.

Board for Anthropological Research Expedition G

 

This series comprises drawings by Aboriginal people that were commissioned by members of the Board for Anthropological Research party whilst on expedition. The process is best described by Charles Pearcy Mountford in 'Aboriginal Crayon Drawings', Records of the South Australian Museum, Vol. 6, pp 1-28: 'Sheets of brown wrapping paper, approximately 50 cm. by 30 cm., were distributed, together with [red, yellow, black and white] crayons..it was especially desired that nothing external should influence the choice either of the subject, the colours chosen or the method of drawing'. The Aboriginal person 'was asked only to make marks (walka) on his paper'. (p5)

Mountford adds that intitially 'simple drawings of everyday things of aboriginal life were made, such as kangaroos, emus, trees, camps and waterholes' but after a week, confidence was gained and 'drawings relating to the travels and exploits of the aborginal's mythical ancestors began to be produced by the older man. From that time onward, no difficulty was experienced in obtaining designs, in fact, it was unfortunate that, as only a limited amount of time was available for interpretation of the detail, and the recording of the data, the distribution of sheets had to be curtailed.' (p6)

Each artist was identified by their data card identifier: see AA 346/4/13

Drawing collected and annotated by: Norman Tindale

For further information see:

  • 'Expedition G. Expedition to Cockatoo Creek, Central Australia. August 6-27, 1931. Journal and field notes by Norman B. Tindale. 1931'. (AA 338/1/7)
  • Sutton, Peter, 1998, 'Aboriginal Maps and Plans', The History of Cartography, volume Two, Book Three, Cartography in the Traditional African, American, Artic, Australian, and Pacific Societies, David Woodward and G Malcolm Lewis (editors), The University of Chicago Press, pp 387-416.

  Date Range 1931, some items are undated
Quantity 100 cm, 22 crayon drawings in 1 archive box
Provenance Board for Anthropological Research

AA346/12

Crayon drawings relating to the Mt Liebig expedition, Northern Territory, 1932.

Board for Anthropological Research Expedition H

 

This series comprises drawings by Aboriginal people that were commissioned by members of the Board for Anthropological Research party whilst on expedition. The process is best described by Charles Pearcy Mountford in 'Aboriginal Crayon Drawings', Records of the South Australian Museum, Vol. 6, pp 1-28: 'Sheets of brown wrapping paper, approximately 50 cm. by 30 cm., were distributed, together with [red, yellow, black and white] crayons..it was especially desired that nothing external should influence the choice either of the subject, the colours chosen or the method of drawing'. The Aboriginal person 'was asked only to make marks (walka) on his paper'. (p5)

Mountford adds that intitially 'simple drawings of everyday things of aboriginal life were made, such as kangaroos, emus, trees, camps and waterholes' but after a week, confidence was gained and 'drawings relating to the travels and exploits of the aborginal's mythical ancestors began to be produced by the older man. From that time onward, no difficulty was experienced in obtaining designs, in fact, it was unfortunate that, as only a limited amount of time was available for interpretation of the detail, and the recording of the data, the distribution of sheets had to be curtailed.' (p6)

Each artist was identified by their data card identifier: see AA 346/4/14

Drawing collected and annotated by: Norman Tindale

For further information see:

  • 'Expedition H. Journal of an Expedition to Mt. Liebig, Central Australia to do Anthropological Research by Norman B. Tindale. Adelaide 1932'. (AA 338/1/8)
  • Sutton, Peter, 1998, 'Aboriginal Maps and Plans', The History of Cartography, volume Two, Book Three, Cartography in the Traditional African, American, Artic, Australian, and Pacific Societies, David Woodward and G Malcolm Lewis (editors), The University of Chicago Press, pp 387-416.

  Date Range 1932, some items are undated
Quantity 100 cm, 20 crayon drawings in 1 archive box
Provenance Board for Anthropological Research

AA346/13

Crayon drawings relating to the Mann & Musgrave Ranges & Ernabella expedition, South Australia, 1933.

Board for Anthropological Research Expedition I

 

This series comprises drawings by Aboriginal people that were commissioned by members of the Board for Anthropological Research party whilst on expedition. The process is best described by Charles Pearcy Mountford in 'Aboriginal Crayon Drawings', Records of the South Australian Museum, Vol. 6, pp 1-28: 'Sheets of brown wrapping paper, approximately 50 cm. by 30 cm., were distributed, together with [red, yellow, black and white] crayons..it was especially desired that nothing external should influence the choice either of the subject, the colours chosen or the method of drawing'. The Aboriginal person 'was asked only to make marks (walka) on his paper'. (p5)

Mountford adds that intitially 'simple drawings of everyday things of aboriginal life were made, such as kangaroos, emus, trees, camps and waterholes' but after a week, confidence was gained and 'drawings relating to the travels and exploits of the aborginal's mythical ancestors began to be produced by the older man. From that time onward, no difficulty was experienced in obtaining designs, in fact, it was unfortunate that, as only a limited amount of time was available for interpretation of the detail, and the recording of the data, the distribution of sheets had to be curtailed.' (p6)

Each artist was identified by their data card identifier: see AA 346/4/15

Drawing collected and annotated by: Norman Tindale

For further information see:

  • 'Journal of an Anthropological Expedition to the Mann and Musgrave Ranges, North West of South Australia, May - July 1933, and a personal record of the Anthropological expedition to Ernabella, Aug. 1933, by Norman B. Tindale. Adelaide 1933'. (AA 338/1/9)
  • Sutton, Peter, 1998, 'Aboriginal Maps and Plans', The History of Cartography, volume Two, Book Three, Cartography in the Traditional African, American, Artic, Australian, and Pacific Societies, David Woodward and G Malcolm Lewis (editors), The University of Chicago Press, pp 387-416.

  Date Range 1933, some items are undated
Quantity 100 cm, 271 crayon drawings in 3 archive boxes
Provenance Board for Anthropological Research

AA346/14

Crayon drawings relating to the Ooldea expedition, South Australia, 1934.

 

This series comprises drawings by Aboriginal people that were commissioned by members of the Board for Anthropological Research party whilst on expedition. The process is best described by Charles Pearcy Mountford in 'Aboriginal Crayon Drawings', Records of the South Australian Museum, Vol. 6, pp 1-28: 'Sheets of brown wrapping paper, approximately 50 cm. by 30 cm., were distributed, together with [red, yellow, black and white] crayons..it was especially desired that nothing external should influence the choice either of the subject, the colours chosen or the method of drawing'. The Aboriginal person 'was asked only to make marks (walka) on his paper'. (p5)

Mountford adds that intitially 'simple drawings of everyday things of aboriginal life were made, such as kangaroos, emus, trees, camps and waterholes' but after a week, confidence was gained and 'drawings relating to the travels and exploits of the aborginal's mythical ancestors began to be produced by the older man. From that time onward, no difficulty was experienced in obtaining designs, in fact, it was unfortunate that, as only a limited amount of time was available for interpretation of the detail, and the recording of the data, the distribution of sheets had to be curtailed.' (p6)

Drawing collected and annotated by: Norman Tindale

For further information see:

  • 'Visits to Ooldea, S. Aust. to study the Aborigines by Norman B. Tindale in 1934 and 1951. Adelaide. S. Australia.' (AA 338/1/13)
  • Sutton, Peter, 1998, 'Aboriginal Maps and Plans', The History of Cartography, volume Two, Book Three, Cartography in the Traditional African, American, Artic, Australian, and Pacific Societies, David Woodward and G Malcolm Lewis (editors), The University of Chicago Press, pp 387-416.

  Date Range 1934, some items are undated
Quantity 100 cm, 91 crayon drawings in 1 archive box
Provenance Board for Anthropological Research

AA346/15

Crayon drawings relating to the Warburton Range expedition, Western Australia, 1935.

Board for Anthropological Research Expedition K

 

This series comprises drawings by Aboriginal people that were commissioned by members of the Board for Anthropological Research party whilst on expedition. The process is best described by Charles Pearcy Mountford in 'Aboriginal Crayon Drawings', Records of the South Australian Museum, Vol. 6, pp 1-28: 'Sheets of brown wrapping paper, approximately 50 cm. by 30 cm., were distributed, together with [red, yellow, black and white] crayons..it was especially desired that nothing external should influence the choice either of the subject, the colours chosen or the method of drawing'. The Aboriginal person 'was asked only to make marks (walka) on his paper'. (p5)

Mountford adds that intitially 'simple drawings of everyday things of aboriginal life were made, such as kangaroos, emus, trees, camps and waterholes' but after a week, confidence was gained and 'drawings relating to the travels and exploits of the aborginal's mythical ancestors began to be produced by the older man. From that time onward, no difficulty was experienced in obtaining designs, in fact, it was unfortunate that, as only a limited amount of time was available for interpretation of the detail, and the recording of the data, the distribution of sheets had to be curtailed.' (p6)

Each artist was identified by their data card identifier: see AA 346/4/15

Drawing collected and annotated by: Norman Tindale and Charles Mountford. In Tindale's Warburton Ranges journal, AA 338/1/14, he notes on the 15th of July '..He [Mountford] will gather native drawings for the Museum collection but will so arrange it that his writings will not clash with my work on the drwaings in their relation to mythology, which I an using for a special purpose. I will engage in the gatherings of drawings also as part of the technique developed by myself for the learning of details of the names & movements of totemic ancestors.'

For further information see:

  • 'Anthropological Expedition to Warburton Range, Western Australia by Norman B. Tindale. July-September 1935. Journal. Adelaide, S. A. 1935'. (AA 338/1/14)
  • Sutton, Peter, 1998, 'Aboriginal Maps and Plans', The History of Cartography, volume Two, Book Three, Cartography in the Traditional African, American, Artic, Australian, and Pacific Societies, David Woodward and G Malcolm Lewis (editors), The University of Chicago Press, pp 387-416.
  • Mountford, 'Aboriginal Crayon Drawings relating to Totemic Places belonging to the Northern Aranda Tribe of Central Australia', Transactions of the Royal Society of South Australia, Vol. 61 pp 85-95
  • Mountford, 'Aboriginal Crayon Drawings. II. Relating to Totemic Places in South-Western Central Australia', Transactions of the Royal Society of South Australia, Vol. 61 pp 30-40
  • Mountford, 'Aboriginal Crayon Drawings III The Legend of the Wati Jula and the Kunkarunkara Women', Transactions of the Royal Society of South Australia, Vol. 62 pp 241-254
  • Mountford, 'Aboriginal Crayon Drawings IV Relating to every-day incidents of the Ngada Tribe of the Warburton Ranges of Western Australia', Transactions of the Royal Society of South Australia, Vol. 63 pp 3-13
  • Mountford, 'Contrast in drawings made by an Australian Aborigine before and after initiation', Records of the South Australian Museum, Vol. 6 pp 111-114

  Date Range 1935, some items are undated
Quantity 100 cm, 271 crayon drawings in 3 archive boxes
Provenance Board for Anthropological Research

AA346/16

Crayon drawings relating to Middleton Ponds, Northern Territory, 1935.

 

All of the drawings say copied on them.

This series comprises drawings by Aboriginal people that were commissioned by members of the Board for Anthropological Research party whilst on expedition. The process is best described by Charles Pearcy Mountford in 'Aboriginal Crayon Drawings', Records of the South Australian Museum, Vol. 6, pp 1-28: 'Sheets of brown wrapping paper, approximately 50 cm. by 30 cm., were distributed, together with [red, yellow, black and white] crayons..it was especially desired that nothing external should influence the choice either of the subject, the colours chosen or the method of drawing'. The Aboriginal person 'was asked only to make marks (walka) on his paper'. (p5)

Mountford adds that intitially 'simple drawings of everyday things of aboriginal life were made, such as kangaroos, emus, trees, camps and waterholes' but after a week, confidence was gained and 'drawings relating to the travels and exploits of the aborginal's mythical ancestors began to be produced by the older man. From that time onward, no difficulty was experienced in obtaining designs, in fact, it was unfortunate that, as only a limited amount of time was available for interpretation of the detail, and the recording of the data, the distribution of sheets had to be curtailed.' (p6)

Drawing collected and annotated by: Charles Mountford

For further information see:

  • Sutton, Peter, 1998, 'Aboriginal Maps and Plans', The History of Cartography, volume Two, Book Three, Cartography in the Traditional African, American, Artic, Australian, and Pacific Societies, David Woodward and G Malcolm Lewis (editors), The University of Chicago Press, pp 387-416.

  Date Range 1935, some items are undated
Quantity 100 cm, 18 crayon drawings in 1 archive box
Provenance Board for Anthropological Research

AA346/17

Crayon drawings relating to the Harvard and Adelaide Universities Expedition to Mt. Margaret and Laverton, Western Australia, May 1939.

Board for Anthropological Research Expedition N

 

This series comprises drawings by Aboriginal people that were commissioned by members of the Board for Anthropological Research party whilst on expedition. The process is best described by Charles Pearcy Mountford in 'Aboriginal Crayon Drawings', Records of the South Australian Museum, Vol. 6, pp 1-28: 'Sheets of brown wrapping paper, approximately 50 cm. by 30 cm., were distributed, together with [red, yellow, black and white] crayons..it was especially desired that nothing external should influence the choice either of the subject, the colours chosen or the method of drawing'. The Aboriginal person 'was asked only to make marks (walka) on his paper'. (p5)

Mountford adds that intitially 'simple drawings of everyday things of aboriginal life were made, such as kangaroos, emus, trees, camps and waterholes' but after a week, confidence was gained and 'drawings relating to the travels and exploits of the aborginal's mythical ancestors began to be produced by the older man. From that time onward, no difficulty was experienced in obtaining designs, in fact, it was unfortunate that, as only a limited amount of time was available for interpretation of the detail, and the recording of the data, the distribution of sheets had to be curtailed.' (p6)

Each artist was identified by their data card identifier: see AA 346/4/20

Drawing collected and annotated by: Norman Tindale and Dr Joseph Birdsell

For further information see:

  • 'Harvard and Adelaide Universities Anthropological Expedition, Australia, 1938-1939. Journal and notes by Norman B. Tindale. I.' (AA 338/1/15)
  • Sutton, Peter, 1998, 'Aboriginal Maps and Plans', The History of Cartography, volume Two, Book Three, Cartography in the Traditional African, American, Artic, Australian, and Pacific Societies, David Woodward and G Malcolm Lewis (editors), The University of Chicago Press, pp 387-416.

  Date Range 1938 - 1939, some items are undated
Quantity 100 cm, 36 crayon drawings in 1 archive box
Provenance Board for Anthropological Research

AA346/18

Children's crayon drawings relating to the Harvard and Adelaide Universities Anthropological expedition to South Australia, New South Wales, Queensland, Cape Barren Island, Tasmania and Western Australia, 1938-1939.

Board for Anthropological Research Expedition N

 

This series comprises of crayon drawings collected by Dorothy Tindale and Bee Birdsell from children during the expedition. The drawings are grouped into boxes by state as follows:

AA 346/18/1 - Drawings relating to South Australia and New South Wales, 1938.

AA 346/18/2 - Drawings relating to New South Wales and Queensland, 1938.

AA 346/18/3 - Drawings relating to Queensland, 1938.

AA 346/18/4 - Drawings relating to Queensland, 1938.

AA 346/18/5 - Drawings relating to Queensland, 1938.

AA 346/18/6 - Drawings relating to Queensland and Cape Barren Island, Tasmania, 1938-1939.

AA 346/18/7 - Drawings relating to New South Wales and South Australia, 1938-1939.

AA 346/18/8 - Drawings relating to Western Australia, 1939.

AA 346/18/9 - Drawings relating to Western Australia, 1939.

For further information see:

  • 'Harvard and Adelaide Universities Anthropological Expedition, Australia, 1938-1939. Journal and notes by Norman B. Tindale. I.' (AA 338/1/15)

  Date Range 1938, some items are undated
Quantity 100 cm, 993 crayon drawings in archive boxes
Provenance Board for Anthropological Research

AA346/19

Crayon drawing from Ooldea, South Australia 1951.

 

This series comprises drawings by Aboriginal people that were commissioned by members of the Board for Anthropological Research party whilst on expedition. The process is best described by Charles Pearcy Mountford in 'Aboriginal Crayon Drawings', Records of the South Australian Museum, Vol. 6, pp 1-28: 'Sheets of brown wrapping paper, approximately 50 cm. by 30 cm., were distributed, together with [red, yellow, black and white] crayons..it was especially desired that nothing external should influence the choice either of the subject, the colours chosen or the method of drawing'. The Aboriginal person 'was asked only to make marks (walka) on his paper'. (p5)

Mountford adds that intitially 'simple drawings of everyday things of aboriginal life were made, such as kangaroos, emus, trees, camps and waterholes' but after a week, confidence was gained and 'drawings relating to the travels and exploits of the aborginal's mythical ancestors began to be produced by the older man. From that time onward, no difficulty was experienced in obtaining designs, in fact, it was unfortunate that, as only a limited amount of time was available for interpretation of the detail, and the recording of the data, the distribution of sheets had to be curtailed.' (p6)

Drawing collected and annotated by: Norman Tindale

For further information see:

  • 'Visits to Ooldea, S. Aust. to study the Aborigines by Norman B. Tindale in 1934 and 1951. Adelaide. S. Australia.' (AA 338/1/13)
  • Sutton, Peter, 1998, 'Aboriginal Maps and Plans', The History of Cartography, volume Two, Book Three, Cartography in the Traditional African, American, Artic, Australian, and Pacific Societies, David Woodward and G Malcolm Lewis (editors), The University of Chicago Press, pp 387-416.

  Date Range 1951
Quantity 100 cm, 1 crayon drawings in 1 archive box
Provenance Board for Anthropological Research

AA346/20

Crayon drawings relating to the Yuendumu expedition, Northern Territory, 1951.

Board for Anthropological Research Expedition P

 

This series comprises drawings by Aboriginal people that were commissioned by members of the Board for Anthropological Research party whilst on expedition. The process is best described by Charles Pearcy Mountford in 'Aboriginal Crayon Drawings', Records of the South Australian Museum, Vol. 6, pp 1-28: 'Sheets of brown wrapping paper, approximately 50 cm. by 30 cm., were distributed, together with [red, yellow, black and white] crayons..it was especially desired that nothing external should influence the choice either of the subject, the colours chosen or the method of drawing'. The Aboriginal person 'was asked only to make marks (walka) on his paper'. (p5)

Mountford adds that intitially 'simple drawings of everyday things of aboriginal life were made, such as kangaroos, emus, trees, camps and waterholes' but after a week, confidence was gained and 'drawings relating to the travels and exploits of the aborginal's mythical ancestors began to be produced by the older man. From that time onward, no difficulty was experienced in obtaining designs, in fact, it was unfortunate that, as only a limited amount of time was available for interpretation of the detail, and the recording of the data, the distribution of sheets had to be curtailed.' (p6)

Drawing collected and annotated by: Norman Tindale

For further information see:

  • 'Copy of Journal made on Expedition to Yuendumu, Central Australia. 13 August - 1st September 1951. By Norman B. Tindale.' (AA 338/4/30)
  • Sutton, Peter, 1998, 'Aboriginal Maps and Plans', The History of Cartography, volume Two, Book Three, Cartography in the Traditional African, American, Artic, Australian, and Pacific Societies, David Woodward and G Malcolm Lewis (editors), The University of Chicago Press, pp 387-416.

  Date Range 1951
Quantity 100 cm, 3 crayon drawings in 1 archive box
Provenance Board for Anthropological Research

AA346/21

Crayon drawings relating to the University of California Los Angeles expedition to Western Australia, 1953.

Board for Anthropological Research Expedition R

 

This series comprises drawings by Aboriginal people that were commissioned by members of the Board for Anthropological Research party whilst on expedition. The process is best described by Charles Pearcy Mountford in 'Aboriginal Crayon Drawings', Records of the South Australian Museum, Vol. 6, pp 1-28: 'Sheets of brown wrapping paper, approximately 50 cm. by 30 cm., were distributed, together with [red, yellow, black and white] crayons..it was especially desired that nothing external should influence the choice either of the subject, the colours chosen or the method of drawing'. The Aboriginal person 'was asked only to make marks (walka) on his paper'. (p5)

Mountford adds that intitially 'simple drawings of everyday things of aboriginal life were made, such as kangaroos, emus, trees, camps and waterholes' but after a week, confidence was gained and 'drawings relating to the travels and exploits of the aborginal's mythical ancestors began to be produced by the older man. From that time onward, no difficulty was experienced in obtaining designs, in fact, it was unfortunate that, as only a limited amount of time was available for interpretation of the detail, and the recording of the data, the distribution of sheets had to be curtailed.' (p6)

Each artist was identified by their data card identifier: see AA 346/4/22

Drawing collected and annotated by: Norman Tindale, Dr Joseph Birdsell and Jud Epling.

Children's drawings collected by: Mr JP Gill. According to Tindale's journal, AA 338/1/19/2 Tindale 'visited Mr J. P. Gill, the school teacher, who showed me & then presented me with a series of drawings made by his school children..Mr Gill has promised to have each child make two drawings for me, one to be based on their own concept of what aboriginal drawings are like & the other one free choice'. (pp1051-3)

For further information see:

  • 'University of Adelaide and University of California Anthropological Expedition, 1952-1954.' (AA 338/1/6)
  • Sutton, Peter, 1998, 'Aboriginal Maps and Plans', The History of Cartography, volume Two, Book Three, Cartography in the Traditional African, American, Artic, Australian, and Pacific Societies, David Woodward and G Malcolm Lewis (editors), The University of Chicago Press, pp 387-416.

  Date Range 1953
Quantity 100 cm, 224 crayon drawings in 1 archive box
Provenance Board for Anthropological Research

AA346/22

Crayon drawings of 'native maps' relating to the University of California Los Angeles expedition to Western Australia, 1953-1954.

Board for Anthropological Research Expedition R

 

This series comprises drawings by Aboriginal people that were commissioned by members of the Board for Anthropological Research party whilst on expedition. The process is best described by Charles Pearcy Mountford in 'Aboriginal Crayon Drawings', Records of the South Australian Museum, Vol. 6, pp 1-28: 'Sheets of brown wrapping paper, approximately 50 cm. by 30 cm., were distributed, together with [red, yellow, black and white] crayons..it was especially desired that nothing external should influence the choice either of the subject, the colours chosen or the method of drawing'. The Aboriginal person 'was asked only to make marks (walka) on his paper'. (p5)

Mountford adds that intitially 'simple drawings of everyday things of aboriginal life were made, such as kangaroos, emus, trees, camps and waterholes' but after a week, confidence was gained and 'drawings relating to the travels and exploits of the aborginal's mythical ancestors began to be produced by the older man. From that time onward, no difficulty was experienced in obtaining designs, in fact, it was unfortunate that, as only a limited amount of time was available for interpretation of the detail, and the recording of the data, the distribution of sheets had to be curtailed.' (p6)

Each artist was identified by their data card identifier: see AA 346/4/22

Drawing collected and annotated by: Norman Tindale, Dr Joseph Birdsell and Jud Epling

For further information see:

  • 'University of Adelaide and University of California Anthropological Expedition, 1952-1954.' (AA 338/1/19)
  • Sutton, Peter, 1998, 'Aboriginal Maps and Plans', The History of Cartography, volume Two, Book Three, Cartography in the Traditional African, American, Artic, Australian, and Pacific Societies, David Woodward and G Malcolm Lewis (editors), The University of Chicago Press, pp 387-416.

  Date Range 1953 - 1954
Quantity 100 cm, 120 crayon drawings in 1 archive box
Provenance Board for Anthropological Research

AA346/23

Crayon drawings relating to the Haast Bluff expedition, Northern Territory, 1956.

Board for Anthropological Research Expedition Y

 

This series comprises drawings by Aboriginal people that were commissioned by members of the Board for Anthropological Research party whilst on expedition. The process is best described by Charles Pearcy Mountford in 'Aboriginal Crayon Drawings', Records of the South Australian Museum, Vol. 6, pp 1-28: 'Sheets of brown wrapping paper, approximately 50 cm. by 30 cm., were distributed, together with [red, yellow, black and white] crayons..it was especially desired that nothing external should influence the choice either of the subject, the colours chosen or the method of drawing'. The Aboriginal person 'was asked only to make marks (walka) on his paper'. (p5)

Mountford adds that intitially 'simple drawings of everyday things of aboriginal life were made, such as kangaroos, emus, trees, camps and waterholes' but after a week, confidence was gained and 'drawings relating to the travels and exploits of the aborginal's mythical ancestors began to be produced by the older man. From that time onward, no difficulty was experienced in obtaining designs, in fact, it was unfortunate that, as only a limited amount of time was available for interpretation of the detail, and the recording of the data, the distribution of sheets had to be curtailed.' (p6)

Drawing collected and annotated by: Norman Tindale

For further information see:

  • 'Copy of 'Journal of a visit to Haast Bluff, Central Australia. 11 August - 1 September, 1956. By Norman B. Tindale'. (AA 338/4/34)
  • Sutton, Peter, 1998, 'Aboriginal Maps and Plans', The History of Cartography, volume Two, Book Three, Cartography in the Traditional African, American, Artic, Australian, and Pacific Societies, David Woodward and G Malcolm Lewis (editors), The University of Chicago Press, pp 387-416.

  Date Range 1956
Quantity 100 cm, 48 crayon drawings in 1 archive box
Provenance Board for Anthropological Research

AA346/24

Crayon drawings relating to Musgrave Ranges (South Australia) and adjacent parts of Western Australia; Giles, Talu, Mt Davies, Mt Lindsay 1957.

Board for Anthropological Research Expedition Z

 

This series comprises drawings by Aboriginal people that were commissioned by members of the Board for Anthropological Research party whilst on expedition. The process is best described by Charles Pearcy Mountford in 'Aboriginal Crayon Drawings', Records of the South Australian Museum, Vol. 6, pp 1-28: 'Sheets of brown wrapping paper, approximately 50 cm. by 30 cm., were distributed, together with [red, yellow, black and white] crayons..it was especially desired that nothing external should influence the choice either of the subject, the colours chosen or the method of drawing'. The Aboriginal person 'was asked only to make marks (walka) on his paper'. (p5)

Mountford adds that intitially 'simple drawings of everyday things of aboriginal life were made, such as kangaroos, emus, trees, camps and waterholes' but after a week, confidence was gained and 'drawings relating to the travels and exploits of the aborginal's mythical ancestors began to be produced by the older man. From that time onward, no difficulty was experienced in obtaining designs, in fact, it was unfortunate that, as only a limited amount of time was available for interpretation of the detail, and the recording of the data, the distribution of sheets had to be curtailed.' (p6)

Drawing collected and annotated by: Norman Tindale

For further information see:

  • ''Journal of Visit to the North West of South Australia and adjacent parts of Western Australia by Norman B. Tindale. April-May 1957'. (AA 338/1/22)
  • Sutton, Peter, 1998, 'Aboriginal Maps and Plans', The History of Cartography, volume Two, Book Three, Cartography in the Traditional African, American, Artic, Australian, and Pacific Societies, David Woodward and G Malcolm Lewis (editors), The University of Chicago Press, pp 387-416.

  Date Range 1957
Quantity 100 cm, 19 crayon drawings in 1 archive box
Provenance Board for Anthropological Research

AA346/25

Crayon drawings relating to the Bentinck Island, Forsyth Island, Mornington Island, Sydney Island and Allen Island expedition, Queensland, 1960.

Board for Anthropological Research Expedition AI

 

This series comprises drawings by Aboriginal people that were commissioned by members of the Board for Anthropological Research party whilst on expedition. The process is best described by Charles Pearcy Mountford in 'Aboriginal Crayon Drawings', Records of the South Australian Museum, Vol. 6, pp 1-28: 'Sheets of brown wrapping paper, approximately 50 cm. by 30 cm., were distributed, together with [red, yellow, black and white] crayons..it was especially desired that nothing external should influence the choice either of the subject, the colours chosen or the method of drawing'. The Aboriginal person 'was asked only to make marks (walka) on his paper'. (p5)

Mountford adds that intitially 'simple drawings of everyday things of aboriginal life were made, such as kangaroos, emus, trees, camps and waterholes' but after a week, confidence was gained and 'drawings relating to the travels and exploits of the aborginal's mythical ancestors began to be produced by the older man. From that time onward, no difficulty was experienced in obtaining designs, in fact, it was unfortunate that, as only a limited amount of time was available for interpretation of the detail, and the recording of the data, the distribution of sheets had to be curtailed.' (p6)

Drawing collected and annotated by: Norman Tindale

For further information see:

  • 'Visit to Bentinck and Mornington Islands, Queensland by Norman B. Tindale. 1960'. (AA 338/1/23)
  • Sutton, Peter, 1998, 'Aboriginal Maps and Plans', The History of Cartography, volume Two, Book Three, Cartography in the Traditional African, American, Artic, Australian, and Pacific Societies, David Woodward and G Malcolm Lewis (editors), The University of Chicago Press, pp 387-416.

  Date Range 1960
Quantity 100 cm, 29 crayon drawings in 1 archive box
Provenance Board for Anthropological Research

AA346/26

Crayon drawings relating to Musgrave Range expedition, South Australia, 1966.

Board for Anthropological Research Expedition AS

 

This series comprises drawings by Aboriginal people that were commissioned by members of the Board for Anthropological Research party whilst on expedition. The process is best described by Charles Pearcy Mountford in 'Aboriginal Crayon Drawings', Records of the South Australian Museum, Vol. 6, pp 1-28: 'Sheets of brown wrapping paper, approximately 50 cm. by 30 cm., were distributed, together with [red, yellow, black and white] crayons..it was especially desired that nothing external should influence the choice either of the subject, the colours chosen or the method of drawing'. The Aboriginal person 'was asked only to make marks (walka) on his paper'. (p5)

Mountford adds that intitially 'simple drawings of everyday things of aboriginal life were made, such as kangaroos, emus, trees, camps and waterholes' but after a week, confidence was gained and 'drawings relating to the travels and exploits of the aborginal's mythical ancestors began to be produced by the older man. From that time onward, no difficulty was experienced in obtaining designs, in fact, it was unfortunate that, as only a limited amount of time was available for interpretation of the detail, and the recording of the data, the distribution of sheets had to be curtailed.' (p6)

Drawing collected and annotated by: Norman Tindale

For further information see:

  • 'Journal of Visit to the North West of South Australia in February 1966 by Norman B. Tindale. 1966'. (AA 338/1/22)
  • Sutton, Peter, 1998, 'Aboriginal Maps and Plans', The History of Cartography, volume Two, Book Three, Cartography in the Traditional African, American, Artic, Australian, and Pacific Societies, David Woodward and G Malcolm Lewis (editors), The University of Chicago Press, pp 387-416.

  Date Range 1966
Quantity 100 cm, 40 crayon drawings in 1 archive box
Provenance Board for Anthropological Research

AA346/27

Crayon drawings not collected during an expedition

 

This series comprises five crayon drawings that were not collected during an expediiton listed in series AA 346/10-26.

  Quantity 5 crayon drawings
Provenance Board for Anthropological Research

AA346/28

Photographs taken at Wilgena, 1925, Expedition A

 

The expedition party included: John Burton Cleland (see AA 60) (Leader), Thomas Draper Campbell (see AA 52), Thorburn Brailsford Robertson, Robert Henry Pulleine (see AA 259), Edwin Rogers Embree, Clark David Wissler.

  Date Range 24 November 1925 - 27 November 1925
Quantity 78 Photographs, negatives and envelopes
Provenance Board for Anthropological Research

AA346/29

Photographs taken at Wilgena and Ooldea, 1926, Expedition B

 

The expedition party included:

  Provenance Board for Anthropological Research

AA346/30

Photographs taken at Macumba, 1926-1927, Expedition C

 

The expedition party included: Thomas Draper Campbell (leader) (see AA 52), Cecil John Hackett (see AA 122), William Ray, John Burton Cleland (see AA 60), Edward Harold Davies (see AA 70), Edward Wheewall Holden.

  Date Range 30 December 1926 - 19 January 1927
Quantity 154 Photographs, negatives and envelopes
Provenance Board for Anthropological Research

AA346/31

Photographs taken at Koonibba, 1928, Expedition D

 

The expedition party included: Thomas Draper Campbell (leader) (see AA 52), John Burton Cleland (see AA 60), Edward Harold Davies (see AA 70), Herbert Henry Woollard, Alexander Killen Macbeth, Robert Henry Pulleine (see AA 259), Arthur Moore and Norman Barnett Tindale (see AA 338).

  Date Range 13 August 1928 - 25 August 1928
Quantity 30 Negatives
Provenance Board for Anthropological Research

AA346/32

Photographs taken at Hermannsburg,1929, Expedition E

 

The expedition party included: Thomas Draper Campbell (Leader), John Burton Cleland (see AA 60), Cecil Stanton Hicks, Edward Harold Davies (see AA 70), Norman Barnett Tindale (see AA 338), Cecil John Hackett (see AA 122), Brian Gilmore Maegraith,
Henry Kenneth Fry (see AA 105) and Herbert Mathew Hale (see AA 105).

  Date Range 4 August 1929 - 23 August 1929
Provenance Board for Anthropological Research

AA346/33

Photographs taken at Macdonald Downs, 1930, Expedition F

 

The expedition party included: Thomas Draper Campbell (Leader), John Burton Cleland (see AA 60), Henry Kenneth Fry (see AA 105), Robert Henry Pulleine (see AA 259), Herbert Mathew Hale (see AA 105), Norman Barnett Tindale (see AA 338), Edward Harold Davies (see AA 70), Thomas Harvey Johnston (see AA 161), Herbert John Wilkinson and
James Hugo Gray.

  Date Range 17 August 1930 - 11 September 1930
Provenance Board for Anthropological Research

AA346/34

Photographs taken at Cockatoo Creek, 1931, Expedition G

 

The expedition party included: Thomas Draper Campbell (Leader), John Burton Cleland (see AA 60), Herbert John Wilkinson), James Hugo Gray, Cecil Stanton Hicks, Robert Henry Pulleine (see AA 259), Norman Barnett Tindale (see AA 338), Eric O Stocker (see AA 311), Alan Leslie Rau, Rex Francis Matters, Herbert Mathew Hale (see AA 105) and Thomas Harvey Johnston (see AA 161).

  Date Range 6 August 1931 - 27 August 1931
Provenance Board for Anthropological Research

AA346/35

Photographs taken at Mount Liebig, 1932, Expedition H

 

The expedition party included: Thomas Draper Campbell (Leader), John Burton Cleland (see AA 60), Thomas Harvey Johnston (see AA 161), Cecil Stanton Hicks, E Eldridge, James Hugo Gray, Henry Kenneth Fry (see AA 105), Herbert Mathew Hale (see AA 124), Norman Barnett Tindale (see AA 338), Eric O Stocker (see AA 311), Edward Wheewall Holden, HO Moore, Theodor George Henry Strehlow and Max Lamshed.

  Date Range 4 August 1932 - 25 August 1932
Provenance Board for Anthropological Research

AA346/36

Photographs taken at Mann and Musgrave Ranges and Ernabella, 1933, Expedition I

 

Mann Range and Ernabella 25 May - 6 August 1933, the expedition party included:
Norman Barnett Tindale (Leader) (see AA338), Cecil John Hackett (see AA 122) and Allan Ferguson Brumby (see AA 42). On 6 August the expedition party were joined by:
John Burton Cleland (Leader), Thomas Harvey Johnston (see AA 161), Cecil Stanton Hicks
James Hugo Gray, Herbert Mathew Hale (see AA 124), Henry Kenneth Fry (see AA 105), Max Lamshed and J O’Connor .

  Date Range 25 May 1933 - 24 August 1933
Provenance Board for Anthropological Research

AA346/37

Photographs taken at Diamantina, 1934, Expedition J

 

The expedition party included; Thomas Draper Campbell (Leader), John Burton Cleland (see AA 60, Thomas Harvey Johnston (see AA 161), Henry Kenneth Fry (see AA 105), Norman Barnett Tindale (see AA 338), Frank John Fenner (see AA 91), Ernest Theodore Vogelsang (see AA 351) and Leslie Andrew Alexander Wilkie.

  Date Range 10 August 1934 - 28 August 1934
Quantity 3 black & white photographs
Provenance Board for Anthropological Research

AA346/38

Photographs taken at Warburton Ranges, 1935, Expedition K

 

The expedition party included; Norman Barnett Tindale (Leader) (see AA 338), Cecil John Hackett (see AA 122), Eric O Stocker (see AA 311), Charles Pearcy Mountford (see AA 228), Ernest Gutteridge, Max Lamshed and Jack Seabourne.

  Date Range 26 July 1935 - 6 September 1935
Provenance Board for Anthropological Research

AA346/39

Photographs taken at Granites, 1936, Expedition L

 

No photographs are held in this collection for the Granites expedition. There may be photographs held in expedition members collections. See party details below.

The expedition party included; John Burton Cleland (Leader) (see AA 60), Thomas Harvey Johnston (see AA 161), Henry Kenneth Fry (see AA105), Charles Pearcy Mountford (see AA 228), Herbert Mathew Hale (see AA 124), Eustace Couper Black (see AA 31) and Olive Muriel Pink.

  Date Range 6 August 1936 - 26 August 1936
Provenance Board for Anthropological Research

AA346/40

Photographs taken at Nepabunna, 1937, Expedition M

 

The expedition party included; John Burton Cleland (Leader) (see AA 60), Charles Pearcy Mountford (see AA 228), Herbert Mathew Hale (see AA 124), Thomas Harvey Johnston (see AA 161), Eustace Couper Black (see AA31), Henry Kenneth Fry (see AA 105), Frank John Fenner (see AA 91) and F Hall.

  Date Range 22 May 1937 - 3 June 1937
Quantity 29 Black and white photographs
Provenance Board for Anthropological Research

AA346/41

Photographs taken at Harvard and Adelaide Universities, 1938-1939 Expedition N

 

The expedition party included; Norman Barnett Tindale (Leader) (see AA 338), Dorothy May Tindale, Joseph Benjamin Birdsell (see AA 689) and Bee G Birdsell.

  Date Range 13 May 1938 - 30 June 1939
Quantity 62 Black and white photographs and negatives
Provenance Board for Anthropological Research

AA346/42

Photographs taken at Ooldea, 1939, Expedition O

 

The expedition party included; John Burton Cleland (Leader) (see AA 60), Thomas Harvey Johnston (see AA 161), Eustace Couper Black (see AA31), Frank John Fenner (see AA 91), Ronald Murray Berndt (see AA 722) and Alison Harvey (see AA 127).

  Date Range 15 August 1939 - 26 August 1939
Quantity 14 Black and white photographs
Provenance Board for Anthropological Research

AA346/43

Photographs taken at Haasts Bluff, 1956, Expedition Y

 

The expedition party included; Thomas Draper Campbell (Leader) (see AA 52), Andrew Arthur Abbie (see AA 688), William Ross Adey, David IB Kerr, ND Crosby, Hugh Le Messurier, John Burton Cleland (see AA 60), Henry Kenneth Fry (see AA 105), Murray James Barrett, DJ Campbell , Gwen Dolores Walsh, B Hill, Charles Pearcy Mountford (see AA 228), JC Dobbie, Norman Barnett Tindale (see AA 338) and G Wherrett.

  Date Range 13 August 1951 - 1 September 1951
Provenance Board for Anthropological Research

AA346/44

Photographs taken at Haasts Bluff, 1957, Expedition AB

 

THIS SERIES IS INCOMPLETE

  Provenance Board for Anthropological Research